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HookJaw  
#1 Posted : Saturday, October 17, 2015 6:04:56 AM(UTC)
HookJaw
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Location: Valley, WI

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Dan Small interviews Adams County hunter who has quite an interesting encounter with a few wolves

The interview starts about 40 minutes into the show (Recorded Oct. 13)

http://www.lake-link.com...an-Small-Outdoors-Radio/



Edited by user Sunday, October 18, 2015 6:26:47 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

...cruisin the 'Poo in my Gum Tree Canoe
William Schlafer  
#2 Posted : Saturday, October 17, 2015 8:10:36 AM(UTC)
William Schlafer
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Human wolf encounters are extremely rare (in the lower 48). It's unusual that this guy was able to get this close to wolves without them knowing about it, or running off. They're very leery and will go to great lengths to avoid people.


-Bill

Edited by user Saturday, October 17, 2015 8:22:45 AM(UTC)  | Reason: damned typos!

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Guillermo  
#3 Posted : Monday, October 19, 2015 10:19:28 PM(UTC)
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A quote taken from the article I read on jsonline, "In an Oct. 3 blog post, Rachel Tilseth of Wolves of Douglas County said the piece has "all the makings of a fictional story spun to sell guns. Or is it a cover up of an illegal hunt?" Cover up of an illegal hunt? The guy was carrying a .38. That isn't the gun you take if you're poaching wolves. What a moron. Should have just kept his mouth shut about the whole thing to avoid the overreactions.
NBrevitz  
#4 Posted : Monday, October 19, 2015 11:06:29 PM(UTC)
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William Schlafer wrote:
Human wolf encounters are extremely rare (in the lower 48). It's unusual that this guy was able to get this close to wolves without them knowing about it, or running off. They're very leery and will go to great lengths to avoid people.


-Bill

I was gonna say... As long as you don't condition Wolves to people and reinforce a positive outcome (food), you'll be ok. Youre far more likely to get attacked by a mother Black Bear than by a Timber Wolf. When I grouse hunt up north, I always take my plug out and place 3 rounds of steel buckshot into the mag before my 6s. That's not a wolf precaution. I've encountered both animals in the wild and I can tell you that Bears are a much scarier animal. The 2 wolves I've seen in the wild took off at incredible speed. These areas are not hunted, so their fear was natural.
The problem is when you have ignorant yuppies (I don't think anybody on this board really applies here) that feed predators like Bear and Wolves. Then the animal must be destroyed through no fault of its own and not in a fair, sporting way.
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
Pete  
#5 Posted : Tuesday, October 20, 2015 1:34:52 PM(UTC)
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Guillermo wrote:
A quote taken from the article I read on jsonline, "In an Oct. 3 blog post, Rachel Tilseth of Wolves of Douglas County said the piece has "all the makings of a fictional story spun to sell guns. Or is it a cover up of an illegal hunt?" Cover up of an illegal hunt? The guy was carrying a .38. That isn't the gun you take if you're poaching wolves. What a moron. Should have just kept his mouth shut about the whole thing to avoid the overreactions.


I read that article too and thought that anyone out poaching wouldn't contact the DNR afterwards and take them to the area to show them the blood trail. the guy's story adds up to me: too warm to hunt so he decided to do some scouting and looks to have surprised some bedded down wolves. If he were poaching, he'd probably be using a rifle with a scope and not doing it in the middle of the day; no poacher could possibly expect to get close enough to a wolf in broad daylight to use a .38.
galleon2  
#6 Posted : Tuesday, October 20, 2015 4:00:00 PM(UTC)
galleon2
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They are increasingly thick where I hunt (Juneau County). Years and years of trail cameras tell the tale. Back in say 2005 - none. Starting in about 2010 or so, we would get a picture of a wolf roaming through every now and then, maybe a picture or two a year. Fast forward a mere 10 years to this year - I have probably 20 pictures this year of what looks to be a pack of 4-6 animals, and their tracks are evident all the time on sandy trails. Each and every one of my neighbors tells the same tale, likely having captured the same pack on their cameras. Throughout this, I have seen only one from my stand, and my hunting buddy saw one leaving his stand one night. Hunters don't like them because wolves eat deer and turkeys - not because hunters are scared of them. As far as the impact of wolves on the deer herd and turkey flocks, its a fact that wolves eat deer and turkeys. How big of an impact do the wolves have? Well, the deer herd and turkey numbers are in constant flux due to a ton of reasons. From my observation and opinion alone, winter weather and hunting conditions/human harvest are the biggest factors where I hunt (with spring flooding along with snow and cold impacting the turkeys more than the deer), with food availability and predation by wolves and bears following that, probably followed by car/deer collisions. But in my immediate neck of the woods, the deer numbers are actually up from say 5 years ago, and during the same time the wolf numbers (or at least their time spent in my immediate vicinity) have gone up as well. Have the wolves moved in from further north because deer are more plentiful the further south they go? Are they just expanding south with reproduction necessitating more space for a larger overall wolf population? All of the above?
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