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William Schlafer  
#1 Posted : Tuesday, February 7, 2017 5:30:36 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
Rank: Super Fly

Joined: 7/24/2011(UTC)
Posts: 3,181
Location: Sussex Wisconsin

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After tying flies for a few years now, I've created a pile of rejects. I've added to the pile flies that wore out while fishing, broke somehow, or came disassembled. I always intended to try and fix them, or harvest them for spare parts. But the pile keeps growing...

UserPostedImage

Hoppers tend to get pretty chewed up by Trout and snags. Buggers tend to break off hooks on rocks. And more than a few Pink Squirrels have come unwrapped.


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
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lightningo2  
#2 Posted : Tuesday, February 7, 2017 9:52:12 PM(UTC)
lightningo2
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ThumpUp nice reject pile! I just went through a box I had, and started a reject pile, but my pile is not nearly as good looking as yours. I also have a lawn caster box, where the real misfits get recycled. Smile
mjager0  
#3 Posted : Tuesday, February 7, 2017 10:22:32 PM(UTC)
mjager0
Rank: May Fly

Joined: 3/25/2014(UTC)
Posts: 130
Man
Location: Madison, WI

I keep old buggers and sometimes recycle the tungsten bead heads or the dumbbell eyes. When a dry or a nymph comes apart it goes in the trash. Ain't nobody got time for that.

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- Matt
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William Schlafer  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, February 8, 2017 9:02:40 AM(UTC)
William Schlafer
Rank: Super Fly

Joined: 7/24/2011(UTC)
Posts: 3,181
Location: Sussex Wisconsin

Thanks: 63 times
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mjager0 wrote:
I keep old buggers and sometimes recycle the tungsten bead heads or the dumbbell eyes. When a dry or a nymph comes apart it goes in the trash. Ain't nobody got time for that.


Stuff is getting expensive. Used to be $5 would buy you 100 pack of hooks. But not anymore. Tungsten bead heads and dumbbells are getting pricey too.


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
moosekid  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, February 8, 2017 2:20:46 PM(UTC)
moosekid
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I have a reject box. It mainly consists of flies that I tied when I was in like 5th grade. Stuff I can't bear to throw out, but can't keep in a normal box lest someone see them and judge my tying skills. Anyways. One day I got all the way upstate only to find that I didn't have my vest. No flies. No tippet. And I had brought a cute girl all the way up from Brooklyn to impress her with my country-boy sensibilities...

...but I did have the reject box, some steelheading gear, and a few reels in my duffel bag. Ended up doing pretty well with a couple rusty hares ears I tied in the 5th grade. I think I caught 6 or 7 fish.
madguy30  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, February 8, 2017 7:21:35 PM(UTC)
madguy30
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Does anyone know of a spot to donate fly materials?

I've come to terms that all of the scud dubbing, pheasant tails, goose biots, etc. were not needed for fishing pretty much anywhere.
weiliwen  
#7 Posted : Thursday, February 9, 2017 8:37:17 AM(UTC)
weiliwen
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my rejects are usually left hooked in trees...
Bob Williams, "Weiliwen"
moosekid  
#8 Posted : Thursday, February 9, 2017 5:44:28 PM(UTC)
moosekid
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madguy30 wrote:
Does anyone know of a spot to donate fly materials?

I've come to terms that all of the scud dubbing, pheasant tails, goose biots, etc. were not needed for fishing pretty much anywhere.


goose biots and pheasant tails are the building blocks of the three most commonly used mayfly nymphs in the game -- the hare's ear, the pheasant tail, and the prince nymph. If you don't tie prince nymphs its not the end of the world to toss the goose biots -- but they can also be used to create very convincing segmented bodies on nymphs and dries. Check it out. http://www.flyfishfood.c...05/tying-with-biots.html
madguy30  
#9 Posted : Thursday, February 9, 2017 7:02:02 PM(UTC)
madguy30
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moosekid wrote:
madguy30 wrote:
Does anyone know of a spot to donate fly materials?

I've come to terms that all of the scud dubbing, pheasant tails, goose biots, etc. were not needed for fishing pretty much anywhere.


goose biots and pheasant tails are the building blocks of the three most commonly used mayfly nymphs in the game -- the hare's ear, the pheasant tail, and the prince nymph. If you don't tie prince nymphs its not the end of the world to toss the goose biots -- but they can also be used to create very convincing segmented bodies on nymphs and dries. Check it out. http://www.flyfishfood.c...05/tying-with-biots.html


Cool, thanks!

My go-tos are dog hair or burlap nymphs with or without partridge feather or griffith's gnats/BWO's, or just buggers and hoppers, so even those may be too much work for me! :)

Cool flies though.
moosekid  
#10 Posted : Friday, February 10, 2017 4:12:03 PM(UTC)
moosekid
Rank: Caddis Fly

Joined: 8/8/2014(UTC)
Posts: 130
Location: New York

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Prince Nymphs can take a little trial and error before you dial them in, but brook trout love them -- and the white horns make an excellent isonychia nymph imitation.

PTs and Hare's ears are easy enough to tie.

I like to keep it simple with my mayfly nymphs cos I lose so many of them in the streambed. PTs for subvaria and baetis -- Hare's Ear for stenonema, dorothea, invaria (works well as a caddis pupae imitation as well) -- Prince Nymphs for the isonychias. I fish a ton of caddis patterns, but I have the most confidence in the holy grail.

If I know something is hatching, I might pick up a more specific pattern at a shop or something, but those are the ones I tie and keep stocked in the appropriate sizes in my box...

The burlap nymph looks very versatile/buggy. Will definitely tie some up.

The all-time most hilarious nymph of all is Walt's Worm. If you don't know the pattern look it up. Thing is, it's stupid effective on stockies cos it basically looks like the pellets they feed them at the hatchery....

Edited by user Friday, February 10, 2017 4:15:24 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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