Driftless Trout Anglers

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Newitroutguy  
#1 Posted : Sunday, June 18, 2017 10:54:17 AM(UTC)
Newitroutguy
Rank: Midge

Joined: 5/6/2017(UTC)
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Location: Green bay wi

Anyone ever fish this area. Never fished thinking about trying
madguy30  
#2 Posted : Monday, June 19, 2017 7:32:26 PM(UTC)
madguy30
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Joined: 2/24/2013(UTC)
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Don't know the whole area all that well but have fished the Deerskin many times and it's a favorite.
Guillermo  
#3 Posted : Monday, June 19, 2017 8:09:47 PM(UTC)
Guillermo
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The springs and creek feed into the Deerskin, so I'd imagine there's trout there. Would depend on how deep the ponds are and how much spawning gravel they have.
Gurth  
#4 Posted : Monday, June 19, 2017 8:45:27 PM(UTC)
Gurth
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I grew up fishing the Deerskin - my first trout stream. Stayed on Deerskin Lake every summer of my childhood.

Most of my trout time was on the Deerskin River, but I also explored a bit of Blackjack back in the day. I remember it being smaller and a bit muddy in comparison. Both Blackjack and the Little Deerskin are a lot of work coz they're small and the foliage can be tight to the water - at least the spots that I went to.

I've never gotten anything other than brookies out of either, but there are supposed to be brownies in the Deerskin. Most of the brookies I've gotten are between 7 and 10 inches. Caught northerns back in the day up to the Little Deerskin confluence, but haven't seen any that high since my childhood.

They removed a dam at some point in the last 10-15 years and that may have cooled the river enough that the northerns don't venture any further than the marsh area anymore.

Never got to the actual Blackjack Springs. Would love to know what they're like if they are cool.

Edited by user Monday, June 19, 2017 8:52:42 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Your mother had a tongue like a trout!
Gurth  
#5 Posted : Monday, June 19, 2017 8:48:41 PM(UTC)
Gurth
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Heading to my parent's place - now on North Twin - in August and will be hitting those streams, or at least the Deerskin.
Your mother had a tongue like a trout!
Guillermo  
#6 Posted : Monday, June 19, 2017 11:07:59 PM(UTC)
Guillermo
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Checked out the springs on google maps, they look like they're pretty silted in. If they are not hydraulically dredged, the fate of these types of ponds is an eventual bog or marshy area. Though that process takes hundreds and even thousands of years.
Gurth  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, June 20, 2017 5:52:28 AM(UTC)
Gurth
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Guillermo wrote:
Checked out the springs on google maps, they look like they're pretty silted in. If they are not hydraulically dredged, the fate of these types of ponds is an eventual bog or marshy area. Though that process takes hundreds and even thousands of years.


There is a bog across Deerskin Road from where our cabin was and we would go out and fish the open pond in the middle for these really dark colored bluegills that had been genetically isolated for likely hundreds (thousands?) of years.

Was really cool as you could see geological time in practice. Where the forest ended and the bog began, evidence of an old shoreline was still visible in rocks that one day long ago had water lapping against them.

Out towards the middle, the bog was suspended over water and would bounce up and down like a raft and occasionally we would step through it and in a panic get our leg back out coz... BOG MONSTER!

Anyway, surprisingly, the open water that was once 100 feet or more across when I was a kid is now less than 20 as the peat or whatever it is does its inevitable work.

Geology and Geography were my favorite courses in college and I love all of the evidence of them that I see every time I hit a lake or stream. Smile


Edited by user Tuesday, June 20, 2017 5:54:42 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Your mother had a tongue like a trout!
Guillermo  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, June 21, 2017 2:08:58 AM(UTC)
Guillermo
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Gurth, very interesting account and I bet those bluegills were beautiful. Being in an environment like that and catching fish that you know have been there basically forever is almost a surreal experience. Those places give me Goosebumps.

Edited by user Wednesday, June 21, 2017 2:11:27 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Gurth  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, June 21, 2017 5:29:53 AM(UTC)
Gurth
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I feel the same when I fish spots where there are only heritage brookies.

I don't remember much about the Bluegills other than they were dark - almost a charcoal color.

In looking at the most recent sat image, the pool we fished is now peated over, so sadly, the bluegills are likely no more unless they became "cave" dwellers. Sad

Oh well... circle of life and all that and time marches on. Someday, another ice age will happen and clear the canvass once again.

Your mother had a tongue like a trout!
William Schlafer  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, June 21, 2017 11:54:06 AM(UTC)
William Schlafer
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You can really see this when you fly over upper Wisconsin and Minnesota. The older lakes slowing filling in, turning into swamps, with trees creeping into what was once open water.

My brother in Duluth owns a small cabin near Virginia Minnesota on a 1000 acre lake. I remember going there in the 70s and fishing off the boat dock for panfish and northern pike. Now the water has now has receded almost 30 yards from where it used to be. Too far for most of the removable boat docks to reach boatable water.


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
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