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Gurth  
#21 Posted : Wednesday, January 24, 2018 3:17:18 PM(UTC)
Gurth
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Originally Posted by: William Schlafer Go to Quoted Post


That's a big one that I learned about five years ago. Stop chasing that next fish, or fixating on numbers as the measuring stick for how good your day was., Learn to enjoy the scenery, the weather, the wildlife, the solitude and the simple act of fishing. Ironically, once you get to that point, the fishing becomes easier and you'll end up catching more and appreciate it more.

As Warren Zevon once said: "Enjoy every sandwich." Words to the wise.


-Bill



I didn't mean to imply that this happens all the time or even often. Luckily, I usually do well enough in the catching department to at least have that aspect of a day be a net neutral.

Fish count is irrelevant. I've had 2 fish days that are some of my most memorable because of what those two were and 15 fish days that were forgettable coz they were all dinks. Hell, my biggest day ever saw me pulling my lure away from chasers by the end of the day coz I just couldn't stomach another 8 inch brown.

I'm talking about a day like last Monday where I scuffled along for 3 fish over about 4 hours AND had to deal with the elements and the challenges of the water I chose to be on.

Ended the day with one last gambit for where some might be which involved a good mile and a half walk along the edge of a farm field that normally isn't a difficult trek.

This day it was uneven due to last fall's plowing, frozen solid and covered in 5 inches of powder. Every freaking step was a slip, trip or stumble. I almost turned back a few times but I sold myself on the possibilities.

Nope. One little shit and that was it.

I was in a foul mood on the stumble back and of course the wind had picked up and was blowing in my face.

It was like the Bataan Death March.

Only… in waders, in the cold and in Wisconsin and without the possibility of a Japanese soldier shooting me. Otherwise though… exactly like the Bataan freaking Death March.

That day was a crap sandwich no matter how you might slice it. Flapper

One memorable fish would have changed my outlook and attitude.

It's not a big issue, but I want to change that mindset. I want to shrug it off as just not my day.

Of course I chose to go out on a 10 degree afternoon knowing that my chances weren't great and then got pissy when it didn't work out.



Trout fishing is like childbirth though. Not too long afterwards you're thinking… that wasn't so bad… I think I'll do that again.

I'm sure my wife would see the similarity. Laugh






.

Edited by user Wednesday, January 24, 2018 4:09:45 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
madguy30  
#22 Posted : Wednesday, January 24, 2018 4:21:32 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: William Schlafer Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Gurth Go to Quoted Post
Don't let results be the main thing that colors my perception of a day.


That's a big one that I learned about five years ago. Stop chasing that next fish, or fixating on numbers as the measuring stick for how good your day was., Learn to enjoy the scenery, the weather, the wildlife, the solitude and the simple act of fishing. Ironically, once you get to that point, the fishing becomes easier and you'll end up catching more and appreciate it more.

As Warren Zevon once said: "Enjoy every sandwich." Words to the wise.


-Bill


That's really what fly fishing did for me...spin fishing to me is much more agenda driven and I felt forced to pay attention to the lure the whole time.

With a fly rod the experience I usually talk about with people is being able to stand in a spot for a long while, and if nothing's happening I can at least slow down to watch what the water's doing, insects around, birds, other wildlife, etc.

I was walking upstream in a warm-water river last summer and met a bunch of tubers; they had some odd looks when they asked me how my day was and my response was 'good--I'm getting a nice work out and hike in' instead of talking about the fish.
Gurth  
#23 Posted : Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:41:56 PM(UTC)
Gurth
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Originally Posted by: madguy30 Go to Quoted Post


That's really what fly fishing did for me...spin fishing to me is much more agenda driven and I felt forced to pay attention to the lure the whole time.

With a fly rod the experience I usually talk about with people is being able to stand in a spot for a long while, and if nothing's happening I can at least slow down to watch what the water's doing, insects around, birds, other wildlife, etc.

I was walking upstream in a warm-water river last summer and met a bunch of tubers; they had some odd looks when they asked me how my day was and my response was 'good--I'm getting a nice work out and hike in' instead of talking about the fish.




Now that right there is some food for thought. The Zen aspects of fly fishing.

I'll admit, that's what has me most curious to give it a try.

I'm chill in everything else I do outdoors. My wife is a mover and gets sick of me stopping to look at this or that or me just wanting to sit for a bit in a spot and soak it in.

I'm not that way on a stream.

Boat? Yes. Stream? No.

I've been doing a lot of looking into a Tenkara setup.

Both as an entry point to fly fishing due to the simplicity and also as another tool in the arsenal for when I'm in some of the tight spots that I go and simply can't hit a great lie with my spin setup. In addition, would be nice to have a compact fishing setup for hiking. Hate carrying even my smallest rod when we're hiking.


I took the old flyrods that I inherited last year out and flailed around one time, but it seemed a bit complicated and maybe even a little intimidating. That and I'm comfortable (and decent) with my chosen approach.

Tenkara has me very intrigued.
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
rschmidt  
#24 Posted : Wednesday, January 24, 2018 5:47:53 PM(UTC)
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Well expectation is the key to unhappiness. Some of the best times are the struggles not the victories. Monker Lake, MN Brule, death swamps of Jackson county. Don't go there if you have a high opinion of yourself. They are terrible beautiful places. R
madguy30  
#25 Posted : Wednesday, January 24, 2018 6:37:29 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Gurth Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: madguy30 Go to Quoted Post


That's really what fly fishing did for me...spin fishing to me is much more agenda driven and I felt forced to pay attention to the lure the whole time.

With a fly rod the experience I usually talk about with people is being able to stand in a spot for a long while, and if nothing's happening I can at least slow down to watch what the water's doing, insects around, birds, other wildlife, etc.

I was walking upstream in a warm-water river last summer and met a bunch of tubers; they had some odd looks when they asked me how my day was and my response was 'good--I'm getting a nice work out and hike in' instead of talking about the fish.




Now that right there is some food for thought. The Zen aspects of fly fishing.

I'll admit, that's what has me most curious to give it a try.

I'm chill in everything else I do outdoors. My wife is a mover and gets sick of me stopping to look at this or that or me just wanting to sit for a bit in a spot and soak it in.

I'm not that way on a stream.

Boat? Yes. Stream? No.

I've been doing a lot of looking into a Tenkara setup.

Both as an entry point to fly fishing due to the simplicity and also as another tool in the arsenal for when I'm in some of the tight spots that I go and simply can't hit a great lie with my spin setup. In addition, would be nice to have a compact fishing setup for hiking. Hate carrying even my smallest rod when we're hiking.


I took the old flyrods that I inherited last year out and flailed around one time, but it seemed a bit complicated and maybe even a little intimidating. That and I'm comfortable (and decent) with my chosen approach.

Tenkara has me very intrigued.


Tenkara would be a good way to learn fly fishing and relatively inexpensive if you through a place like Badger Tenkara (I recommend the Classic--works fine for me).

I'd learn in a place that has very little overhead canopy/trees etc. Using a fly rod in that scenario takes a while to learn, and adding 3 feet of rod adds one more thing to possibly break.

Once you get used to the process of fly fishing it's really only as complicated as you make it. It's still the same concept: put something in front of fish that they think is food, and they either bite or they don't.

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