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madguy30  
#241 Posted : Tuesday, January 7, 2020 10:24:25 PM(UTC)
madguy30
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Originally Posted by: William Schlafer Go to Quoted Post
In many of Kelly Galloup's videos he preaches proper tension when applying materials to a hook, and using effective thread techniques when securing them. Applying half-hitches when tying off materials helps prevent them from coming loose before you tie on the next material. A good thread base is also helpful when tying patterns like the Woolly Bugger. Wrapping hackle forward with the thread (like a wire wrap) also helps secure it from coming loose. I often apply a little head cement (or superglue) to lead wrap to keep it from spinning on the hook or coming loose as other materials are applied.

Here's a short video from Kelly on tension control and setting the thread during a tie:



One thing I've learned from watching really skilled fly tiers is the control they have with their fingers when they place materials. There are some tricks to learn, but mostly I feel that control comes with practice and experience. This is something I've struggled with now for years. Especially when stacking deer hair.

Controlling the materials, placing them properly and applying the thread effectively are the most important traits of a good fly tier.


Good luck!
-Bill



Thanks for this!

The thing I generally enjoy about fly fishing is keeping the brain working with learning different things.
madguy30  
#242 Posted : Sunday, January 19, 2020 4:18:47 PM(UTC)
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Update....I think I got a 'fix' for my materials sliding down, or at least the beads anyway.

Just wrapping a nice bundle of thread just under the beadhead creates a big 'bump' that it can't get past so it's secured.

Likely something that everyone does to begin with and I'm behind on it but just in case anyone else was experiencing the same issues.
William Schlafer  
#243 Posted : Sunday, January 19, 2020 5:58:54 PM(UTC)
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If you use lead wire to add weight on a Bugger pattern, a neat trick is to wrap the wire around the hook and then add a drop of superglue towards the top of the wrap (nearest the beadhead). Then quickly push the wire wraps up to the bead and hold for a second or two. Then add thread wraps over the wire and the hook as usual. That will lock everything down nice and tight to the hook.


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
madguy30  
#244 Posted : Sunday, January 19, 2020 6:42:08 PM(UTC)
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Yeah I haven't used wire for a long time (marabou usually soaks enough water up in most situations/current) but thought of putting maybe just a couple of wraps around just to secure it.

Now I just need it to be May/June so I can see if it works. :)

Although I might throw out a bugger here and there for trout just to mess around.
William Schlafer  
#245 Posted : Sunday, February 23, 2020 4:39:13 PM(UTC)
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Gunner Brammer has a baitfish pattern that I tried to copy that uses hackle and marabou from a Pheasant Rump Patch. He has versions that mimic a batifish and another in a sculpin pattern. The baitfish version features a couple of stick on eyes encased in UV resin that form the head. The sculpin has a spun deer head.

UserPostedImage

UserPostedImage

These Pheasant Patches are inexpensive and provide enough material for dozens of flies. The hackle feathers are beautifully patterned and have color variations that range from brown, orange, blue and green. They make excellent hackle for dry and wet flies with a nice scale of smaller to larger feathers.

UserPostedImage

The UV resin head is a little tricky to form into the proper shape. But with a little practice it creates a solid bulb that provides for some weight in the front, and really makes the fly almost indestructible. The other tricky part is getting the eyes to stay in the proper position to get the resin applied. Gunner used clear mono thread to tie the eyes down. I found that difficult to do, so I used small drops of resin to tack them into position long enough to get them covered and locked them in place. The body is built up by alternating wrapped hackle from longer to smaller lengths (back to front) with alternating layers of wing marabou plucked from the flank areas of the patch.

UserPostedImage
UserPostedImage

The sculpin pattern features a couple of small feathers that are supposed to mimic the splayed out pectoral fins at the sides that distinguish the sculpin outline. The feathers I choose were too wide and I had difficulty getting them to stick out at the proper angle. They're supposed to look like this:
UserPostedImage

I need to locate some smaller feathers for this and play around with how they're tied in to get better results. Some darker deer hair may be a better choice also.

UserPostedImage

I really like the coloring and mottling of the feathers. The big tails will give these a great swimming movement as they move though the water. The size is just perfect for Driftless streams, coming in around 2 1/2" - 3" in length tied to a number 4 Gamakatsu B10s hook.

UserPostedImage

Can't wait to give these a try!


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
weiliwen  
#246 Posted : Sunday, February 23, 2020 5:04:22 PM(UTC)
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Really nice, Bill. I watched some guys tie streamers like this yesterday at the CWTU TroutFest. They said that they just peeled off the eyes from the sticky patch, then "painted" on the UV cure over top along with the rest of the head. so, it was the UV cure that actually fastened the eyes to the fly. They made it look easy, but you know how that goes...
Bob Williams, "Weiliwen"
thanks 1 user thanked weiliwen for this useful post.
William Schlafer on 2/23/2020(UTC)
William Schlafer  
#247 Posted : Sunday, February 23, 2020 6:11:59 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: weiliwen Go to Quoted Post
Really nice, Bill. I watched some guys tie streamers like this yesterday at the CWTU TroutFest. They said that they just peeled off the eyes from the sticky patch, then "painted" on the UV cure over top along with the rest of the head. so, it was the UV cure that actually fastened the eyes to the fly. They made it look easy, but you know how that goes...



Thanks!

It's frustrating how expert tiers easily perform simple things like placement of materials, or manipulating their hands/fingers. I've been doing this for a little while now, but it still feels like I'm wearing boxing gloves sometimes. Recognizing and selecting quality materials is another tough thing to learn. I've got piles of junk I'll never use that I bought on impulse.

That said, these little streamers are pretty straight-forward and easy to tie compared to those complicated articulated jobs. I want to fish more baitfish, crayfish and sculpin patterns this year.


-Bill

Edited by user Monday, February 24, 2020 2:19:17 AM(UTC)  | Reason: damned typos!

“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
madguy30  
#248 Posted : Monday, February 24, 2020 1:18:09 PM(UTC)
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Is there such a thing as 'long' strung marabou?

Only thing I can find labeled is 'medium', which is a tad short for how I tie my woolly buggers...I just wrap it around as the body and add hackle feathers. I can use multiple medium feathers to make it work, but one piece is ideal and I swear I used to have some.

I've decided 'woolly bugger' marabou, which I accidentally picked up or didn't realize what it was, is pointless and wasteful or at least more work if you cut the strands off the stem directly.

JGF  
#249 Posted : Monday, February 24, 2020 6:51:56 PM(UTC)
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Really nice flies, Bill. Gunnar is a good follow on FB and YouTube. He does some interesting stuff and like Gallop and Cheech, he explains what and why he's doing something effectively.


Originally Posted by: madguy30 Go to Quoted Post
Is there such a thing as 'long' strung marabou?

I've decided 'woolly bugger' marabou, which I accidentally picked up or didn't realize what it was, is pointless and wasteful or at least more work if you cut the strands off the stem directly.



I use it to cover up articulated streamer connections mostly.

OTC_MN  
#250 Posted : Wednesday, February 26, 2020 1:42:12 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: madguy30 Go to Quoted Post
Is there such a thing as 'long' strung marabou?

Only thing I can find labeled is 'medium', which is a tad short for how I tie my woolly buggers...I just wrap it around as the body and add hackle feathers. I can use multiple medium feathers to make it work, but one piece is ideal and I swear I used to have some.

I've decided 'woolly bugger' marabou, which I accidentally picked up or didn't realize what it was, is pointless and wasteful or at least more work if you cut the strands off the stem directly.



Getting decent marabou is a crap shoot sometimes and it seems like it's getting worse. I've pretty much sworn off Wapsi since the last 3 or 4 packs I got I ended up with almost half the bag being unusable. Hareline is marginally better. The Fish Hunter brand from Nature's Spirit is the best I've found for consistency and quality. More expensive, but I'm not throwing away 1/3 at a minimum. Plus the colors are unreal. Both Wapsi and Hareline have either premium or select marabuo too. Never tried them though...
"Our tradition is that of the first man who sneaked away to the creek when the tribe did not really need fish."
- Roderick Haig-Brown
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