Driftless Trout Anglers

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hambone870  
#1 Posted : Friday, May 27, 2011 9:06:24 PM(UTC)
hambone870
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 2/4/2011(UTC)
Posts: 217
Location: il wi border

I drifted nymphs for a good portion of the day using a pink squirrel as an attractor and a brassie as a dropper off the back. The best fight of the day came from a stocky rainbow taken from a current seam of a large pool. Instantly after being hooked the silver rocket rose high in the water and started a series of violent headshakes just under the surface. Digging hard, my rainbow dove down for the depths of the pool taking back all of the line I had just gained. My three weight throbbed as the fish bulldogged me using the current to its advantage. For the first time ever, I put a stream trout on the reel and palmed it for some extra drag. With the extra pressure, I just nearly avoided being broken off in some downed timber. I really put some tension on the fish and was able to break her plane. She rose to the surface, tired, and I took the opportunity to take the line back as quick as possible. The fish was guided on to the bank where she promptly spit the barbless hook and made a half hearted attempt to flop back into the water. I dove for the fish like a linebacker after a fumbled pig-skin and brought the fish to hand!


I took a half dozen more browns on some elk hair caddis and had a blast catching suckers one after another from a single pool. Great fun on my three weight, and all fish were turned back!
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Mark Dahlquist  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 6:21:35 AM(UTC)
Mark Dahlquist
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Blake what if you hook into one of those 20"+ bruiser bows (or cutbows?) that Mike has caught in the past? Will a 3wt cut it as long as your final tippet and drag are set to match the strength of the fish?

When you fish for steel and salmon using egg pattern or maybe streamers (bigger flies) what is your final length of your tapered leader? Use fluorocarbon tippet to add on as needed? What is your final tippet strength in pounds if you were to land a mid 20"s salmanoid? Do you prefer to drift downstream and across for big flies?
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hambone870  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 8:48:02 AM(UTC)
hambone870
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 2/4/2011(UTC)
Posts: 217
Location: il wi border

I rig my fly rod setup different then most. I use a loop connector directly to the fly line and use straight mono or floro as the entire length of leader. The leader material is connected with a surgeons loop at one end slid through the connector loop. Then take the tag end and run it through the eye of surgeons loop and pull tight. Most people dont rig their fly rods like that, but i love it.

i use 2-4 pound test for trout

i use 8 pound for steelies and salmon

my leader is always vanish flouro unless throwing dry flies when i will switch to mono. I like the thought of using lighter line and just heavy enough equipment it just seems more sporting. I hardly ever break off a fish. For throwing bigger flies i will normally strip them all the way back in.
Richie  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:39:34 AM(UTC)
Richie
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 4/14/2011(UTC)
Posts: 214
Location: Kenosha

HamBone, I use the loop to loop as well and love it. Fast, simple and strong.

Mark, I've been using my 3wt the last couple of trips and haven't had an issue landing the fish without stressing them out. I landed both of those larger fish in under a minute. I didn't time it but it was fast and they were fighting to get out of my hand when placed in the water. I always crank down my drag if there is a log, undercut bank or anything like that before I cast into a nice looking hole.

On a side note, I've noticed that if you rub the belly of a fish it seems to make them revive faster. Don't ask me why but I've talked with a lot of guys who do it as well and believe it works.

Fishing larger flies...I think both are extremely effective. Stripping a large leech or bugger upstream can be deadly but you have to be careful not to point your rod tip directly at the fish when they attack the fly because the leader to tippet knot could break (if its a larger fish on lighter line). If its overcast or rainy I like to tie on a thicker tippet and give me a little extra insurance.

A drag free drift will also do the job, and if you use a strike indicator you can set the proper depth to where the fly is bumping the bottom as it drifts. Thats how I picked up both fish on the last trip.

When I fish across the current I pick up a lot of hits when line is in the swing and about to straighten out. This is where the fly/lure/bait whatever is rising in the water column right in front of the fish and they can hardly resist. This is really effective if fishing a dropper rig with something big and ugly up front (for attention) followed by something small. You'd be surprised at how many big fish will eat the smaller fly as its right in their face.

Hambone, I forgot to mention it but that rainbow has some beautiful color.

Richie



Edited by user Wednesday, June 1, 2011 9:43:21 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

hambone870  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 10:05:48 AM(UTC)
hambone870
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 2/4/2011(UTC)
Posts: 217
Location: il wi border

Richie wrote:
Stripping a large leech or bugger upstream can be deadly but you have to be careful not to point your rod tip directly at the fish when they attack the fly because the leader to tippet knot could break (if its a larger fish on lighter line).

Hambone, I forgot to mention it but that rainbow has some beautiful color.


45 degree angle for sure, thanks Richie. What do you use for leader material and how do you connect to the loop?
unknowns  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 10:50:27 AM(UTC)
unknowns
Rank: Stone Fly

Joined: 12/27/2010(UTC)
Posts: 61

Man, fighting a +20" fish on a 3wt must be something else. I use a 4wt and was ready to call in air support with the 18 incher I landed last week. Then again, that's my personal best trout and I haven't been at it very long.

Do you guys get a lot of trout to the reel? I usually just strip them in.
Richie  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 11:20:26 AM(UTC)
Richie
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 4/14/2011(UTC)
Posts: 214
Location: Kenosha

I use Rio Tapered leaders. I like the long butt section of the leader that allows easy turnover of the fly. I used your standard loop to loop connection from fly line to leader. I slide the leader loop over the top of the fly line loop and thread the end of the leader line through the "back" of the fly line loop. Goodness...that sounds complicated but its really not.

I like to keep the length of the leader to match the length of the rod. Not exactly but pretty close to make casting easier. I've only fished a couple rivers where the fish are truly "leader shy" and that was the San Juan River. I found it a lot easier to catch fish with a longer leader...just my experience.
I'll use the leader right out of the bag until I start to eat about 8" or so off the leader. From there I start to rebuild it with tippet.

I'll try to get majority of my fish on the reel. I reel on with my left hand and strip with my right. When a fish hits the fly, I'll "loosly" pinch the stripped line (with my right index finger) putting tension on the line but allowing the fish to take it if needed. I also use my right pinky finger to pinch the rest of the slack line so that it goes smoothly onto the reel...(hopefully that made sense) while doing this I'm reeling like a mad man with my left hand. This is where having a large arbor really comes into play. But I feel once the fish is on the reel then you can adjust your drag accordingly and you don't have to mess around with all the stripped line getting in the way, or dealing with the current taking the line and wrapping it around your downstream leg..etc etc. I think you have a better chance of landing larger fish if you get them on the reel.

Richie
hambone870  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 11:44:18 AM(UTC)
hambone870
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 2/4/2011(UTC)
Posts: 217
Location: il wi border

unknowns wrote:
Do you guys get a lot of trout to the reel? I usually just strip them in.


The rainbow on the top of this post is the only fish this year I've put on the reel
hambone870  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 11:58:53 AM(UTC)
hambone870
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 2/4/2011(UTC)
Posts: 217
Location: il wi border

Richie wrote:
I think you have a better chance of landing larger fish if you get them on the reel.
Richie


Thats for sure!
ted4887  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, June 1, 2011 12:32:14 PM(UTC)
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Rank: Guest

Joined: 2/27/2010(UTC)
Posts: 4,883

Richie wrote:

On a side note, I've noticed that if you rub the belly of a fish it seems to make them revive faster. Don't ask me why but I've talked with a lot of guys who do it as well and believe it works.



^^^

...Insert inappropriate joke here...
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