Driftless Trout Anglers

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drag city  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, April 18, 2012 8:52:25 PM(UTC)
drag city
Rank: Stone Fly

Joined: 3/13/2012(UTC)
Posts: 73
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Hey folks,

I've noticed on the board and on the stream that lots of us seem to feel like a pink squirrel is a can't miss local fly. So why do you think that is? What's particular about our streams that allows this fly to work so well and so often? I'm always trying to learn about flies and presentation, so I'd love to hear what ya'll have to say. Sound off!

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brookieseeker14  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, April 18, 2012 8:59:11 PM(UTC)
brookieseeker14
Rank: May Fly

Joined: 1/3/2012(UTC)
Posts: 38
Location: Cedar Falls, IA

some people say it might resemble a scud which would explain its success in the driftless. I personally think its a combination of the pink collar and the overall "bugginess" of the fly that causes reaction bites. It definately catches fish. 75 percent of the time I throw that with a midge larvae trailer!
flyfishingfreak  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, April 18, 2012 9:03:18 PM(UTC)
flyfishingfreak
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 8/19/2010(UTC)
Posts: 580
Man

I've heard some say its the contrast between the pink the and the squirrel body, along with the "buggy-ness" They also look like a caddis larva, but with a pink collar instead of a more natural tone.
I've caught fish in wisconsin, utah, and montana with that fly! so it isn't just the driftless!
KojDads  
#4 Posted : Thursday, April 19, 2012 6:54:19 AM(UTC)
KojDads
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 3/15/2012(UTC)
Posts: 166
Man
Location: Hudson

From what i've heard what makes the pink squirrel so effective is that the collar makes it look like an egg pattern, trout are programmed to eat eggs, because they have no hands like we do the use their mouth to tast it and that’s when we get'em!!!

But while I was down at The Driftless Angler I was able to meet John Bethke, the creator of the pink squirrel he said it was his favorite color chenille (that worked) and he liked how the fox squirrel hairs gave it a webby look, the antron and dubbing gave it contrast and flash. ThumpUp


I will always trade 20 average sized fish for "the one" 20 plus....
drag city  
#5 Posted : Thursday, April 19, 2012 3:15:25 PM(UTC)
drag city
Rank: Stone Fly

Joined: 3/13/2012(UTC)
Posts: 73
Location: Minneapolis, MN

Hmm, egg pattern. Until now I was assuming that it was more or less designed to be an attractor pattern -- the pink being a sort of neon sign to induce strikes. But your egg-imitation theory, brookieseeker, has got me thinking. If it is an egg pattern, would that suggest that the pink squirrel might be most effective in spring and fall -- that is, when various species are spawning?

Or, is its versatility is the key -- in other words, being able to imitate eggs, caddis pupae, as well as act as an attractor? Seems like lots of flies that we catch fish on don't just imitate one thing, they more sort of suggest a number of different things depending on conditions, drift, etc. This might be my pink squirrel theory, but I for one like to hear more from the gallery....
Trouts  
#6 Posted : Thursday, April 19, 2012 6:32:45 PM(UTC)
Trouts
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 1/23/2011(UTC)
Posts: 236
Location: Minneapolis

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I think both the buggy squirrel and the pink are equally important. Like what has already been mentioned, several major patterns such as the copper john and the prince nymph really don't do that great of a job of imitating a specific insect. They all have flash of some sort that attract fish.
“If the trout are lost, smash the state. More than any other fish, trout are dependent upon the ambience in which they are caught… At the first signs of deterioration, this otherwise vigorous fish just politely quits, as if to say, ‘If that’s how you want it…’”
brookieseeker14  
#7 Posted : Friday, April 20, 2012 6:15:51 AM(UTC)
brookieseeker14
Rank: May Fly

Joined: 1/3/2012(UTC)
Posts: 38
Location: Cedar Falls, IA

Trouts, I love the quote my lefy Kreh... so true!
LenH  
#8 Posted : Friday, April 20, 2012 6:31:07 AM(UTC)
Guest
Rank: Guest

Joined: 2/27/2010(UTC)
Posts: 4,883

have a buddy that ties a close to squirrel fly...

he calls it a Goestch Beaver....

all pink....no collar....with strip of opaque ribbon on the back.

UserPostedImage

attractor fly.
Trouts  
#9 Posted : Friday, April 20, 2012 2:15:48 PM(UTC)
Trouts
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 1/23/2011(UTC)
Posts: 236
Location: Minneapolis

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Thats interesting Len. I have been thinking of tying up some with almost all of the body being pink.
“If the trout are lost, smash the state. More than any other fish, trout are dependent upon the ambience in which they are caught… At the first signs of deterioration, this otherwise vigorous fish just politely quits, as if to say, ‘If that’s how you want it…’”
William Schlafer  
#10 Posted : Friday, April 20, 2012 2:58:05 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
Rank: Super Fly

Joined: 7/24/2011(UTC)
Posts: 3,057
Location: Sussex Wisconsin

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I like the egg theory also. My Lake Trout and Salmon fishing buddies swear by eggs and egg patterns.

Pink Squirrels seem to catch Trout in any water. Pools, riffles, slow runs, weedy water. Fished deep, fished shallow, works everywhere.

-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
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