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scottybs  
#11 Posted : Monday, April 27, 2015 5:48:06 PM(UTC)
scottybs
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NBrevitz wrote:
Numbers are down, but the streams should come around. Tribs to both systems have produced plenty of fish for me the past couple of years. Keep in mind that Brown Trout don't do as well in the colder winters as Brookies do. Brook Trout evolved in glacial streams. Browns evolved to survive the larger, warmer streams of Europe. Their native range once spread to N Africa.
I think the past 3 winters, all of which have had stretches of brutal conditions, have taken a toll on the Browns.


Not buying it…. plenty of brownies in the Scandanvian countries where it can be quite cold. I believe it is the last FEW years of massive flooding during runoff (except this year) and the summer storms.
trapper  
#12 Posted : Monday, April 27, 2015 5:53:45 PM(UTC)
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Goggle up Grey Goat fly fishing and read what Andy has to say.
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Lights  
#13 Posted : Monday, April 27, 2015 5:55:20 PM(UTC)
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It could be a multitude of problems. But all I know is the # are WAY down on the Rush and the Kinnickinnic. I have fished them for more than 25 years and have never seen it this bad.
NBrevitz  
#14 Posted : Monday, April 27, 2015 5:59:44 PM(UTC)
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scottybs wrote:
NBrevitz wrote:
Numbers are down, but the streams should come around. Tribs to both systems have produced plenty of fish for me the past couple of years. Keep in mind that Brown Trout don't do as well in the colder winters as Brookies do. Brook Trout evolved in glacial streams. Browns evolved to survive the larger, warmer streams of Europe. Their native range once spread to N Africa.
I think the past 3 winters, all of which have had stretches of brutal conditions, have taken a toll on the Browns.


Not buying it…. plenty of brownies in the Scandanvian countries where it can be quite cold. I believe it is the last FEW years of massive flooding during runoff (except this year) and the summer storms.

There's a reason Brookies can survive further north in colder conditions. But yeah the flooding is probably a factor in survival of younger fish. That said, the Rush fished pretty well last year, as did the Kinni. From what I've seen, the Brook Trout streams have held up quite nicely, at least those that I've fished.
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
ozzyky  
#15 Posted : Monday, April 27, 2015 6:30:35 PM(UTC)
ozzyky
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Well maybe the size will improve cause I'm gettin tired of all the dink browns that have taken over The rush the last ten years. Yes I've caught bigs but not like it used to be.
shebs  
#16 Posted : Monday, April 27, 2015 6:46:14 PM(UTC)
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ozzyky wrote:
Well maybe the size will improve cause I'm gettin tired of all the dink browns that have taken over The rush the last ten years. Yes I've caught bigs but not like it used to be.


I'm hoping that you're right. From what I've heard and seen, numbers are down on both sides of the border - hopefully this means we'll have some tanks in a couple years.

To Nick's point - I have also noticed more brookies in some of the mixed streams I've fished. Even caught a few yesterday in a stream I fish regularly that I thought was exclusively browns - probably fished it 25 times in the last year and had never caught a brook before. Water levels are scary low (lower than last fall, even) on one of the smaller creeks I like to fish for brookies - I shudder to think what will happen if we don't get some serious rains this summer.
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TreArrow  
#17 Posted : Monday, April 27, 2015 7:34:25 PM(UTC)
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Location: Blackduck, MN

scottybs wrote:
NBrevitz wrote:
Numbers are down, but the streams should come around. Tribs to both systems have produced plenty of fish for me the past couple of years. Keep in mind that Brown Trout don't do as well in the colder winters as Brookies do. Brook Trout evolved in glacial streams. Browns evolved to survive the larger, warmer streams of Europe. Their native range once spread to N Africa.
I think the past 3 winters, all of which have had stretches of brutal conditions, have taken a toll on the Browns.


Not buying it…. plenty of brownies in the Scandanvian countries where it can be quite cold. I believe it is the last FEW years of massive flooding during runoff (except this year) and the summer storms.



I would agree the flooding is more of an issue than cold. Huge floods are hard on young of the year fish, and maybe scrub aquatic insects from the streams as well, which could explain the decrease in quality adult fish. I also think folks are being just a bit impatient with this season. Water temps have been low and so have flows, get a bit warmer water and higher water and things should hopefully pick up.

As far as the logic on Scandinavia goes, I would add that the Scandinavian countries aren't really colder than MN or WI, at least in terms of winter lows. Yes they are colder on average, but their extreme cold, except for regions at altitude or above the arctic circle, isn't that different from here. In many areas the Baltic serves as a moderating influence on winter temps. For example, Kuusamo in the North of Finland has winter lows that are typically warmer than some cities in Northern MN, it just stays cooler in the summer, so its average temp is quite a bit lower than here.

To my knowledge the high altitude portions of Norway, and the high latitude areas of Lapland support more resident arctic char and grayling than browns, and where browns are found they can be migratory. Plus climate doesn't have an absolute impact on water temps. If a stream is fed substantially by ground water it might actually be pretty warm even in a cold winter like 2014. There are places in the arctic above treeline that are normally too cold for char or salmon, but support both because they are spring fed. Cold temps should have more of a negative effect on streams of Northern MN, or the UP that lack ground water and form substantial anchor ice in cold winters.
mmalyuk  
#18 Posted : Tuesday, April 28, 2015 12:35:02 PM(UTC)
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Besides the past couple of cold winters and heavy flooding(except this Spring) the other thing to consider is that the Rush overall has been extremely low and clear this Spring(even the lower stretches). Not exactly ideal fishing conditions for pressured fish.
s.t.fanatic  
#19 Posted : Wednesday, April 29, 2015 11:13:57 AM(UTC)
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Surveys in S.E. MN. were down 40% from past years. Size however is up. This is directly related to the poor survival rates of trout fry because of spring flooding the past few years was more than usual. On the up sided of things, the lack of flooding this spring will produce the best year class of trout we have had in a long time. It may be down now but I believe in a few short years it will be outstanding. I would think that with the exceptional year class of trout and the low numbers of adult trout this year the ones that are in the stream will show tremendous gains in size by next year. Which is great because the farmers a killing all the bugs that the fish eat.

Now if only more people would start keeping limits of trout off of SOME of the cookie cutter streams in the area they could produce some hogs. I would maybe even consider fishing them if that happened. To many mouths to feed = smaller fish.
s.t.fanatic  
#20 Posted : Wednesday, April 29, 2015 11:15:59 AM(UTC)
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With the low water in my neck of the woods one of the larger systems has produced exceptional fishing as opposed to past years with high flows and more turbid water.
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