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DanE  
#11 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2015 7:23:45 AM(UTC)
DanE
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 9/18/2014(UTC)
Posts: 1,239
Location: Prairie Du Sac, WI

William Schlafer wrote:
madguy30 wrote:
Update on this...made the trek, and just fished south and near Readstown. One stream had a few trout, and I caught a warmouth sunfish in the same pool as a couple of trout...that was new. Also some decent fish there.

Other stream was Reads Creek. Top part of the stream looked pretty normal, but the sections around and downstream of Cty T were filled in with weeds (can't remember the name), with one feeder stream being completely choked with them.

There was also quite a bit of silt, and the least amount of fish I've ever seen there. It was sad to see...that creek is typically in great shape on all areas, and not hurting for fish.



Someone did some work above Cty Hwy M last year, mostly stream bank armoring I think. I haven't fished it in a couple seasons, but in the past Reads Creek can be pretty hit and miss. Some spots aren't that great, but another 1/4 mile upstream would be much better fishing. The section up by the nursery used to be good Brook Trout water. Like most streams along the Kickapoo, it can flood pretty hard, and it changes character after every flood event.


-Bill


I fished up from M late last year. It was tough fishing (1 4 inch brown) until I got up to where they did some work where it gets close to the road, got a couple nice ones out of that pool. Geri at the DA said I should have fished downstream in the pasture when I talked to her that afternoon.
madguy30  
#12 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2015 8:03:21 AM(UTC)
madguy30
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Does anyone live out in the area and has driven by Reads Creek to see what I'm getting at?

I'm not concerned with how the actual fishing was...catching fish is hardly the reason I'm out in the streams...

I'm more concerned with the fact that there really thick weeds that take up a lot of the stream, which has never been present in the 4 years that I've fished it, and it may be due to manure runoff.

The stream that goes under the Cty T bridge is usually completely open, and there's actually typically fish sitting there...as I've stated, it's now completely choked/full from these weeds.
Zugbug  
#13 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2015 8:43:10 AM(UTC)
Zugbug
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Regarding the recommendation to fish Camp Creek upstream from G -.my recollection is that the land is posted, and I've heard that the landowner is not friendly. Fishing downstream from G is good, but you'll definitely have company.

Edited by user Tuesday, June 23, 2015 8:44:56 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

William Schlafer  
#14 Posted : Tuesday, June 23, 2015 11:32:35 AM(UTC)
William Schlafer
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It's not that uncommon to see extensive weed growth in DA streams during the summer months. Some streams are heavy with it every year. Others have it one year, and hardly any the next. I'm not sure that nutrients from runoff is the primary cause, but it's certainly possible. There's always a big bloom of weeds in lakes by this time of year.

Several of my favorite streams are weed choked by mid-summer nearly every year making sub-surface fishing impossible. A change in tactics helps.

Abandon the pools and slow water sections of the stream and try fishing the fast water and riffles. Trout will move into this shallower weed-free water during certain times of the day to feed on emerging bugs. Bouncing a bead head nymph through the rocks can make for some exciting aerobatic strikes. The trick is to look for and find those small pockets of holding water in the riffles. Any larger rocks in the stream should get particular attention. With all the chaos and turbulence in the water, it's possible to get very close to those spots without being detected by the Trout.

Move upstream. Usually, the higher you get on most streams, the steeper the grade. The faster water will keep in stream weed growth in check. Also during the warmer months, Trout will migrate upstream seeking cooler water near the streams source. Look for those little feeder streams and seeps.

Another tactic is to fish hoppers, or other surface high-floating terrestrials. Work the channels or openings in the weeds and toss the hopper into those seams. Be ready for the strike, as the Trout will dive back down into the weed mat, which can make extraction difficult. Keep the rod tip up, ready to set the hook.

A gully washer storm can help flush out some streams of weeks and excess silt. The days following a blowout can be an excellent time to fish, once the high water recedes. A brief flood also knocks down those pesky stream bank weeds making it easier to move around and get into casting position.


-Bill

Edited by user Tuesday, June 23, 2015 1:40:07 PM(UTC)  | Reason: damned typos

“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
madguy30  
#15 Posted : Wednesday, June 24, 2015 9:09:35 AM(UTC)
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Thanks for the info...but again, I'm not looking for tactics for catching fish, or where to fish on Camp Creek.

It will be interesting to see what happens with Reads....I'm not sure if anyone is understanding just how much the vegetation was taking up and how little the amount of fish seen was...these weren't typical late-summer weeds.
StorminNorman  
#16 Posted : Wednesday, June 24, 2015 9:36:05 AM(UTC)
StorminNorman
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Joined: 9/12/2014(UTC)
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I'll send you a PM - I have some great tactics for weedy streams and some great spots on Camp Creek!

But seriously, maybe you should contact the DNR or local TU chapter and ask them for info regarding the weed growth. They'll probably have a better explanation for it than anyone on here.
DanE  
#17 Posted : Wednesday, June 24, 2015 10:39:18 AM(UTC)
DanE
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 9/18/2014(UTC)
Posts: 1,239
Location: Prairie Du Sac, WI

madguy30 wrote:
Thanks for the info...but again, I'm not looking for tactics for catching fish, or where to fish on Camp Creek.

It will be interesting to see what happens with Reads....I'm not sure if anyone is understanding just how much the vegetation was taking up and how little the amount of fish seen was...these weren't typical late-summer weeds.


Admittedly, I have not fished that spot or know it like you do. It seems to me that it may just be the normal evolution of a stream in our area. Floods blow things out, wash out stream banks, potentially introduces manure or other fertilizers in the stream, redeposit sediment from one spot to another, etc. I think we have all dealt with stretches of stream changing over time, or quickly by flooding. Sometimes great spots turn to crap, and sometimes spots that used to be crap, change for the better. Hopefully the next big flood will clean out that spot and bring it back to it's former glory.
madguy30  
#18 Posted : Thursday, June 25, 2015 12:00:04 PM(UTC)
madguy30
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DanE wrote:
madguy30 wrote:
Thanks for the info...but again, I'm not looking for tactics for catching fish, or where to fish on Camp Creek.

It will be interesting to see what happens with Reads....I'm not sure if anyone is understanding just how much the vegetation was taking up and how little the amount of fish seen was...these weren't typical late-summer weeds.


Admittedly, I have not fished that spot or know it like you do. It seems to me that it may just be the normal evolution of a stream in our area. Floods blow things out, wash out stream banks, potentially introduces manure or other fertilizers in the stream, redeposit sediment from one spot to another, etc. I think we have all dealt with stretches of stream changing over time, or quickly by flooding. Sometimes great spots turn to crap, and sometimes spots that used to be crap, change for the better. Hopefully the next big flood will clean out that spot and bring it back to it's former glory.


I don't know if 'glory' is the best word...it was just a nice stream that made it look like I knew what I was doing. :)

It's certainly quite a stretch to wash out...probably 3/4 mile total, maybe more with bends. It's also not the only stream obviously, so is easy to check out on my way to another one.
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