Driftless Trout Anglers

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Brook trout restoration Options
NE IA Drifter
#1 Posted : Wednesday, January 27, 2016 2:51:05 PM
Rank: Caddis Fly


Joined: 7/10/2013
Posts: 149
Location: Decorah
http://blog.nature.org/s...t-springs-fish-fishing/

I didn't know there were sea run brookies! Interesting article hope something like this develops in the driftless.

Side note - f3t has a great video on brook trout in Patagonia, monster brook trout!!
William Schlafer
#2 Posted : Wednesday, January 27, 2016 4:25:27 PM
Rank: Super Fly


Joined: 7/25/2011
Posts: 2,733
Location: Sussex Wisconsin
The WDNR Driftless Area Stream Master Plan paints a pretty gloomy picture of the long term prospects for Brook Trout in the area. Rising water temperatures will likely lead to major declines in Brook Trout numbers, while more heat tolerant Brown Trout, and other warm water species, should replace them.


-Bill

“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
weiliwen
#3 Posted : Wednesday, January 27, 2016 4:32:56 PM
Rank: Caddis Fly


Joined: 4/16/2014
Posts: 172
Location: Lincolnshire, Illinois
I really enjoyed that article. I'm a big Ted Williams fan anyway, so read as much of his articles as I can. He's not necessarily objective (I tend to view him as the Michael Moore of environmental journalism), but there are plenty of places to find the other side of the story.

These sea run brookies seem to be the equivalent of my absolute favorite trout to fish for, sea run cutthroat trout from my home state of Oregon. The salt water part of their life cycle wasn't discussed in the article, which, after all, is about stream restoration, but I'd be interested to see if it matches that of the SRC's, which often only venture out as far as bays or just offshore for brief periods.
rschmidt
#4 Posted : Wednesday, January 27, 2016 10:01:16 PM
Rank: May Fly


Joined: 1/16/2015
Posts: 334
Location: West WI
I am sure they did the homework, but I don't share same opinion in several of the regions on current and projected population estimates. R
Pete
#5 Posted : Thursday, January 28, 2016 3:45:06 PM
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 6/30/2011
Posts: 484
Location: Far west suburbs of Chicago
weiliwen wrote:

These sea run brookies seem to be the equivalent of my absolute favorite trout to fish for, sea run cutthroat trout from my home state of Oregon. The salt water part of their life cycle wasn't discussed in the article, which, after all, is about stream restoration, but I'd be interested to see if it matches that of the SRC's, which often only venture out as far as bays or just offshore for brief periods.



Much of what I know about brook trout was picked up from Nick Karas' book. There were some real surprises in it, for example, the Kishwaukee watershed in north central Illinois held brook trout as recently as the early 1900s.

He did have a few chapters on salters, and as you surmised, they don't wander far: they'll winter over in bays or around the coastline and then head back into the tributaries as the ocean water starts to warm. It sounds almost nothing like steelhead or Atlantic salmon who will travel a long way in open oceans. they're able to do this because of how flexible they are in their diets; they'll eat just about whatever is available: aquatic insects, terrestrials, worms, small fish, rodents, whatever. Often we think of them as stupid when in fact they've evolved to survive by eating whatever comes their way.
NBrevitz
#6 Posted : Thursday, January 28, 2016 7:34:19 PM
Rank: Super Fly


Joined: 3/17/2013
Posts: 1,133
Location: Lake Elmo, Mn
rschmidt wrote:
I am sure they did the homework, but I don't share same opinion in several of the regions on current and projected population estimates. R

Same. I can think of many Brookie streams that never exceed 60 degrees. Even if those temps went up 5 degrees, which is a huge jump, the Brookies would be fine. They can tolerate upper 60s for a while fairly easily assuming there are spring seeps.
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
s.t.fanatic
#7 Posted : Friday, January 29, 2016 3:21:50 PM
Rank: Dragon Fly


Joined: 3/24/2010
Posts: 619
Location: Altura
I dont buy into the disappearing of brook trout opinion. In S.E. MN. i am constantly catching brookies in watter that in my 25+ years of fishing hadent held them in the past. We need to stop eating meat and get rid of all the cattle to stop global warming. Right?
s.t.fanatic
#8 Posted : Friday, January 29, 2016 3:29:15 PM
Rank: Dragon Fly


Joined: 3/24/2010
Posts: 619
Location: Altura
My son fished a stream this past Sunday and caught 14 Brookies and 0 browns with the majority of them between 9-12". That is on a stream that in the past held mostly brown trout. This small entirely private stream has produced two brown trout that i know of to be over 6# another one that I caught over five pounds and couldn't catch two years later when he was considerably bigger before he disappeared. It has produced a brookie over 17" and multiple tigers. It has also had many beaver dams over the years with several currently and still produces a skewed ratio of brooks to browns. This stream also hasnt been stocked in well over 30 years.
shebs
#9 Posted : Friday, January 29, 2016 6:53:26 PM
Rank: Stone Fly


Joined: 5/13/2014
Posts: 760
Location: Mpls
If the horrible land practices of the previous century didn't totally wipe them out, they're unlikely to be totally wiped out even with warming. But this isn't to say we're not going to lose populations in some of the more marginal streams where they have been reintroduced. Shorter length streams with steady spring flow - obviously they'll always be there - headwaters as well. They are "Char of the spring" (Salvelinus fontinalis) after all. But I think the rebound you're seeing has more to do with conservation and better ag practices than anything else. I've noticed this as well in some of my favorite streams, with brookies re-taking streams that were almost exclusively filled with browns for decades.

But with warming, you will absolutely still see the loss of brook trout in some of the streams that have been recently recolonized, and warmer air temps means more warming as you get further from the springs, so you're going to see losses on the lower end of streams that may currently have some.

The DNR knows what they're talking about, folks. If you carefully read the master plan documents, they are clearly differentiating between areas where they will and won't be lost (or are more/less likely) in a warming world. We'll still have holdouts in the headwaters and some of the truly cold streams Nick and Ron are referring to, but let's not act like we're doing them any favors by pumping CO2 into the atmosphere like we have another planet to live on once we've trashed this one.
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. ~Author Unknown
Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
Guillermo
#10 Posted : Saturday, January 30, 2016 1:24:21 AM
Rank: May Fly


Joined: 6/26/2013
Posts: 282
Location: Wisconsin
The overall decline in native Brook Trout in the last couple centuries has been very much because of increased fishing pressure. 200 years ago, they were caught by the ton, literally. Bag limits now have been greatly reduced, but it didn't happen soon enough. What we are left with for the most part is streams where they can't get past 12 inches. I know bigger ones are caught occasionally, but overall their size is down tremendously. Stocking of brook trout and introduction of browns also played a huge role. This is a pretty interesting article about brookies in Pennsylania: http://www.post-gazette.com/spo...and/stories/201303310190
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