Driftless Trout Anglers

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mmalyuk  
#1 Posted : Friday, April 8, 2016 3:52:58 PM(UTC)
mmalyuk
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 4/24/2010(UTC)
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Location: western wisconsin

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I took my buddy out trouting again the other day. His second time, he's definitely hooked. We landed 38 fish, pretty well split between browns and brookies. Biggest fish were a pair of 18 inch browns and a 13.5" brookie.

Lost a brute of a brown while pulling the net off my back. My buddy was a bit downstream or he would have netted it no problem. Anybody have any luck going back after a big fish they saw or had on? This has only worked for me once and the fish was 1 hole up from the previous location. How long did you wait? Same lure or different?
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Mark Dahlquist  
#2 Posted : Friday, April 8, 2016 6:44:57 PM(UTC)
Mark Dahlquist
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Location: Minnesota

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Matt I generally wait 3-5 days. Good luck.
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s.t.fanatic  
#3 Posted : Monday, April 11, 2016 6:28:41 AM(UTC)
s.t.fanatic
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Man of the big trout I have caught over the years I went back after and scored. Always still in the same holes.
George  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, April 19, 2017 11:58:56 AM(UTC)
George
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Location: Lake Geneva, WI

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I've been big brown hunting and trying to catch the same fish twice. I am trying to see how territorial they are. My hunch is that they are and rarely move much more than 50 yards in either direction. Too much effort for the big boys. Fishing a night is the time for the pigs to come out. Headlight and dusk should do the trick and hit streams that are class 2 that may have creek chubs. The big browns eat these bastards so throwing streamer at them is key.
NBrevitz  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, April 19, 2017 2:02:53 PM(UTC)
NBrevitz
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I've done it successfully for big Brookies, I generally wait 2-3 days and return with a large aggressive presentation. If that doesn't do the trick I'll drift a whole crawler without any weight. That method is absolutely deadly. Thread the hook down the worm to where the point is about halfway through the body. When you get a take, feed for 5 seconds and set the hook. I've caught nice Browns with this method too.
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
p_gundlach  
#6 Posted : Thursday, April 20, 2017 3:21:49 PM(UTC)
p_gundlach
Rank: Caddis Fly

Joined: 7/20/2010(UTC)
Posts: 62
Man
Location: Brookfield, WI

I was just thinking about this same thing earlier this week. I haven't had too many occasions to revisit the site of a big fish I saw or lost or caught and released; too long of trip typically. What I Have found however is that often some of the biggest fish I've caught tend to give me a couple of cracks at them within a few minutes. One that still haunts me was a trout I hooked into that broke me off in Grant County years ago. About an hour later, one hole up, I hooked into a beast of a trout again. After several minutes I felt the line go limp, and as I pulled in, I'll be darned if my hook and line from the first breakoff wasn't attached to my hook. I never did see that fish despite having it on twice.

The biggest fish I ever did land took four swipes at it (must have felt metal at least a couple times) before I finally had a good hookset.

Just earlier this week I was fishing Dane and Iowa Counties, and hooked into a snag. As I was aggressively trying to get unhooked, I discovered I yanked my line right out of a very large brown's mouth. OOooops. Surprisingly enough, about five minutes later he hit again, a nice 20 inch brown with a big kype. Sometimes the fishing gods frown on us and sometimes they smile. . . I didn't feel that I deserved that fish, but I didn't complain!

Have others had similar experiences with large trout? It seems to me that they feed infrequently, but when they are in feed mode, sometimes they are bound and determined to eat, even if they've been hooked already.
s.t.fanatic  
#7 Posted : Friday, April 21, 2017 6:14:53 AM(UTC)
s.t.fanatic
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p_gundlach wrote:
I was just thinking about this same thing earlier this week. I haven't had too many occasions to revisit the site of a big fish I saw or lost or caught and released; too long of trip typically. What I Have found however is that often some of the biggest fish I've caught tend to give me a couple of cracks at them within a few minutes. One that still haunts me was a trout I hooked into that broke me off in Grant County years ago. About an hour later, one hole up, I hooked into a beast of a trout again. After several minutes I felt the line go limp, and as I pulled in, I'll be darned if my hook and line from the first breakoff wasn't attached to my hook. I never did see that fish despite having it on twice.

The biggest fish I ever did land took four swipes at it (must have felt metal at least a couple times) before I finally had a good hookset.

Just earlier this week I was fishing Dane and Iowa Counties, and hooked into a snag. As I was aggressively trying to get unhooked, I discovered I yanked my line right out of a very large brown's mouth. OOooops. Surprisingly enough, about five minutes later he hit again, a nice 20 inch brown with a big kype. Sometimes the fishing gods frown on us and sometimes they smile. . . I didn't feel that I deserved that fish, but I didn't complain!

Have others had similar experiences with large trout? It seems to me that they feed infrequently, but when they are in feed mode, sometimes they are bound and determined to eat, even if they've been hooked already.



The biggest trout I have ever caught took a lure retrieved extremely slow after going through every lure I had with three times each. She just kept swiping at my lures so I just kept changing lures and the way I presented them. Eventually it worked. I must have worked that one fish a good half hour or a bit longer.
rschmidt  
#8 Posted : Sunday, April 23, 2017 7:32:36 AM(UTC)
rschmidt
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Joined: 1/16/2015(UTC)
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Location: West WI

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Sit down and wait a half hour it will eat, it has to. R
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