Driftless Trout Anglers

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chenhyperborea  
#1 Posted : Monday, August 1, 2016 5:34:56 PM(UTC)
chenhyperborea
Rank: Caddis Fly

Joined: 7/17/2013(UTC)
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I know this occurrence is not impossible but somewhat rare .... I landed the same Brown about a month apart, on the same fly and within about 50 yards of one another. I like to think I do everything in my power to ensure the survival of the fish as I try to practice catch & release technique. I have a good friend that's a game warden and he's always saying that catch & release anglers kill about every fish they release - I made to sure to send this photo his way :-)
Someone did point out that the fish does look a bit more depressed the second time he was caught :-)

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Unless one can enjoy himself fishing with the fly, even when his efforts are unrewarded, he loses much real pleasure. More than half the intense enjoyment of fly-fishing is derived from the beautiful surroundings, the satisfaction felt from being in the open air, the new lease of life secured thereby, and the many, many pleasant recollections of all one has seen, heard and done."
Charles F. Orvis, 1886
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West Branch  
#2 Posted : Monday, August 1, 2016 6:19:53 PM(UTC)
West Branch
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Joined: 9/23/2012(UTC)
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Without a doubt, that'se same fish. You even got him to pose the same way!

As far as catch and release being lethal to most trout, I don't believe it. I often visit a heavily fished special regulations stream with a 14" minimum length where most fish are released by most anglers. Only occasionally--maybe a couple of times a year--do I see a dead fish on the creek bottom. There could easily be more dead fish out of sight, under bank hides or in deep holes, I suppose, but few are visible. If catch and release fishing was that hard on fish, it seems like the stream bed would be littered with dead fish.
JGF  
#3 Posted : Monday, August 1, 2016 8:12:59 PM(UTC)
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A game warden should probably know better...there is a lot of research on catch and release mortality and it is nowhere near 50%. If it were, our waters would be littered with dead trout and C&R sections would have really low numbers of trout. Mortality obviously varies greatly depending on fish species, water conditions, handling (mostly how long they're keep them out of the air), etc. Mortality ranges are generally from a couple of percent (fly and single hook lure caught fish) to around 40 percent for very deep water fishes and bass tournaments in warm water (apparently getting sloshed around in a livewell for 8 hours isn't good for long-term survival). From one study that accumulated other research - both fresh and saltwater - under a wide variety of conditions; the average mortality rate was about 16%.

Mortality of fly caught (small, single hook) is a couple of percent (2-4%) under most conditions - certainly higher under warm water and low dissolved oxygen. Mortality of streamer caught fish is usually a little higher as the hook is more likely to penetrate the brain. Mortality of bait caught fish is usually 10 or 12%. Being informed about how to best release fish (cutting the line on deep hooked fish, etc.) reduces mortality a lot.

Over the years, I've had a few fish that I've known to be fairly reliably caught at least a couple of times in a year.
Guillermo  
#4 Posted : Tuesday, August 2, 2016 10:43:55 PM(UTC)
Guillermo
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Dry hands, big barbed hooks and water 65 or above are all a disaster waiting to happen. Avoid these and I'd like to think that mortality is almost non-existent, except in the rare case a fish is deep hooked. In said case it would be advisable to keep and eat it.
rschmidt  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 4:57:31 AM(UTC)
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The studies I have read indicate that the most important factor affecting angler induced mortality has nothing to do with the hooks or lures. WI DNR had fish handling as the highest risk factor. IE dry hands, scale disruption, length of time out of water, exposure of gill plate etc. Being a frequent visitor to similar spots, I also see no major evidence that fish mortality is high when fish are properly handled and released quickly. The one I hate to see (not me)is gut hooked with a drifted worm snipped at the line. This happens every opening day. I usually see 3 to 5 fish in this condition still hitting spinners, but my guess is they are goners. R
Guillermo  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 1:24:20 PM(UTC)
Guillermo
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rschmidt wrote:
The studies I have read indicate that the most important factor affecting angler induced mortality has nothing to do with the hooks or lures. WI DNR had fish handling as the highest risk factor. IE dry hands, scale disruption, length of time out of water, exposure of gill plate etc. Being a frequent visitor to similar spots, I also see no major evidence that fish mortality is high when fish are properly handled and released quickly. The one I hate to see (not me)is gut hooked with a drifted worm snipped at the line. This happens every opening day. I usually see 3 to 5 fish in this condition still hitting spinners, but my guess is they are goners. R

I agree that hooks probably don't make a difference by themselves, but barbed hooks are harder to unhook which keeps the fish out of the water longer and forces you to handle it more.
shebs  
#7 Posted : Friday, August 5, 2016 3:52:53 PM(UTC)
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Nice. ThumpUp

Eddie and I caught the same fish, out of the same hole, ~4 months apart. It happens more than you might think. Bastard grew almost 2 inches in that time, too.

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Edited by user Friday, August 5, 2016 3:54:08 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
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