Driftless Trout Anglers

Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Gerrber  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 5:51:46 AM(UTC)
Gerrber
Rank: Midge

Joined: 6/8/2015(UTC)
Posts: 48
Location: Caseys Breakfast pizza/St.Paul

I see ECHO is releasing a new series of rods called Bad Ass Glass this fall in the 8-12wt size( https://echoflyfishingbl...07/21/new-rods-for-2017/ ) . I'm looking for a pike rod for next season and the 9wt looks damn sexy. Does anyone have past experience with heavier weight glass rods? I personally haven't added any glass to my quiver of rods yet but I did learn on a real slow action graphite 3wt rod that I absolutely love casting with.

I just haven't seen many of the larger rod builders with glass rods in the 6+ weight size. Does anyone have experience with or know any pro's or cons of throwing large flies with big glass(besides slowing down your stroke); poor hooksets, matching lines to the rod, major issues with punching through wind? Obliviously a test cast is in order before purchase.
Sponsor
kschaefer3  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 9:22:16 AM(UTC)
kschaefer3
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 10/10/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,537
Location: St. Paul, MN

I wouldn't be caught dead fishing glass in that high of a line weight, but that's just me. There's so much weight in the whole line/fly setup that I would think it would collapse. The highest weight glass I have handled is an 8 at with a sinking line. Never again!

Mr. Frick? How wrong am I?

Disclaimer: I hate glass. I have never cast one I thought cast worth a shit. Maybe they have all had mismatched line.

Edited by user Wednesday, August 3, 2016 9:23:15 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

NE IA Drifter  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 9:22:48 AM(UTC)
NE IA Drifter
Rank: Caddis Fly

Joined: 7/9/2013(UTC)
Posts: 162
Location: Decorah

Thanks: 6 times
Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 2 post(s)
Someone with more knowledge can correct me but another consideration when the rods get larger is the weight of glass rods. I would also like to know why there isn't glass rods in the 9+ foot range for nymphing.
NE IA Drifter  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 9:25:28 AM(UTC)
NE IA Drifter
Rank: Caddis Fly

Joined: 7/9/2013(UTC)
Posts: 162
Location: Decorah

Thanks: 6 times
Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 2 post(s)
kschaefer3 wrote:
I wouldn't be caught dead fishing glass in that high of a line weight, but that's just me. There's so much weight in the whole line/fly setup that I would think it would collapse. The highest weight glass I have handled is an 8 at with a sinking line. Never again!

Mr. Frick? How wrong am I?

Disclaimer: I hate glass. I have never cast one I thought cast worth a shit. Maybe they have all had mismatched line.


You should try a epic glass rod if you have the chance. I finished their 476 and really like the feel after I lawn cast it. Definitely slower than fast graphite but still enough backbone. All about preferences.
Jared  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 9:25:48 AM(UTC)
Jared
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 8/7/2013(UTC)
Posts: 278
Location: Appleton

Modern companies making heavy line weight glass rods is relatively new, not a lot of places doing it yet, but that is changing. I don't have any experience with the Echo rods, but I have an 8 weight Epic that is a great rod. I'm not throwing wet sock type pike flies with it, but it throws heavily weighted streamers and big deer hair stuff like a rocket once you get the stroke down. I was casting this weekend with probably a 20mph wind, I cast the Epic and a TFO BVK in 8 weight (a "fast" graphite rod) and didn't feel like the glass rod handicapped me to any real degree.

Epics are known for being on the fast side of glass. They also make a 9 weight which I've cast, but don't own that will throw pike flies. Their 10 weight is short, like 7'9" and is well regarded as a pike/musky rod because the short length makes figure 8ing a little more comfortable.

As far as your other questions, hooksetting, if you're pike/musky fishing you should be strip setting anyway, the extra flex shouldn't hurt at all. Glass rods seem to be a little less picky about line weight, although be aware of what you're buying, a lot of modern lines are at least a half line size heavier than standard to make up for the current trend in graphite rods to be super fast.

I'd say try one out if you're interested. As I've said on here before, I'm a big fan of the glass rods, owning 3, 5, 6 and 8 weights. They're super durable and they have great feel.
"I often wonder why anyone as lazy, as fond of fishing and so little concerned with dogma as myself should have chosen such a hard path"
-Roderick Haig-Brown
Guillermo  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, August 3, 2016 5:00:13 PM(UTC)
Guillermo
Rank: May Fly

Joined: 6/25/2013(UTC)
Posts: 429
Location: Wisconsin

Thanks: 19 times
Was thanked: 25 time(s) in 23 post(s)
Nothing at all wrong with heavy glass rods. More durable than graphite and more feel. I would encourage anyone in the market to check out Steffen Brothers in Arizona. They make incredible S-glass rods all the way up to 9 weight.
MNFishhunter  
#7 Posted : Friday, September 2, 2016 1:18:28 PM(UTC)
MNFishhunter
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 4/3/2013(UTC)
Posts: 401
Location: S.E. MN

I left Kyle hanging on this one. I have lots of glass and some where around 7 to 8 weight, a graphite rod makes more sense. I still love all my glass, but an old System 9 is a pain to cast. I also have an Epic 990 and a large collection of Fenwicks, 5 to 9 weights - 755 to 108. There too many to mention.

Edited by user Friday, September 2, 2016 1:19:10 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Users browsing this topic
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF.NET | YAF.NET © 2003-2018, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.239 seconds.