Driftless Trout Anglers

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Mark Dahlquist  
#11 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2016 10:54:55 AM(UTC)
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I'm always amazed brook trout can survive up there. Not really much for springs? These are freestone streams for the most part? I've had the pleasure of fishing a couple of spots Shannon has fished and find these to be quite beautiful. But one in particular, the source is a lake where I catch smallies, pike, and walleye.
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shebs  
#12 Posted : Wednesday, September 7, 2016 11:51:34 AM(UTC)
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Mark Dahlquist wrote:
I'm always amazed brook trout can survive up there. Not really much for springs? These are freestone streams for the most part? I've had the pleasure of fishing a couple of spots Shannon has fished and find these to be quite beautiful. But one in particular, the source is a lake where I catch smallies, pike, and walleye.


I think there is some groundwater seepage from the wetlands up there, but definitely the forests and canyons keep the water cooler than it would be if it was exposed to more direct sunlight.
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. ~Author Unknown
Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
TreArrow  
#13 Posted : Monday, September 12, 2016 11:21:41 AM(UTC)
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There are definitely spring seeps here and there on the better north shore streams, nothing like the driftless, but there are pockets of ground water. Lake effect temps and forest cover also help cool the streams. Many start off warm, pick up ground water and then enter deep shaded canyons where they cool a bit more. Still most streams are right at the upper thermal limit for brook trout, and climate change is likely to make things even harder on the trout up there. I've heard from the MN DNR that the brookies up on the north shore may be better adapted to warm water than the brookies down in the DA, but still warm water often means that fish can't feed optimally and they end up stressed and growing less than they would in a stream with cooler water temps.

NBrevitz  
#14 Posted : Monday, September 12, 2016 3:15:03 PM(UTC)
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shebs wrote:
Mark Dahlquist wrote:
I'm always amazed brook trout can survive up there. Not really much for springs? These are freestone streams for the most part? I've had the pleasure of fishing a couple of spots Shannon has fished and find these to be quite beautiful. But one in particular, the source is a lake where I catch smallies, pike, and walleye.


I think there is some groundwater seepage from the wetlands up there, but definitely the forests and canyons keep the water cooler than it would be if it was exposed to more direct sunlight.

Thick forest cover in the headwater areas is a huge part of it. Lake Superior moderates the climate nicely as well. The biggest issue up there is dry weather. That hasn't been a problem for a few years. Freestone streams need that rain to keep the marshes full and flows strong.
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
shebs  
#15 Posted : Monday, September 12, 2016 8:23:11 PM(UTC)
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TreArrow wrote:
There are definitely spring seeps here and there on the better north shore streams, nothing like the driftless, but there are pockets of ground water. Lake effect temps and forest cover also help cool the streams. Many start off warm, pick up ground water and then enter deep shaded canyons where they cool a bit more. Still most streams are right at the upper thermal limit for brook trout, and climate change is likely to make things even harder on the trout up there. I've heard from the MN DNR that the brookies up on the north shore may be better adapted to warm water than the brookies down in the DA, but still warm water often means that fish can't feed optimally and they end up stressed and growing less than they would in a stream with cooler water temps.



Interesting. I have noticed many streams up there running above 70 degrees in late summer some years, but the brookies manage to hold on. Definitely the size seems capped by the combination of warmer water and a less fertile ecosystem. Interesting to think they could have adapted so much so quickly, seeing as how theyre not truly native above the barriers up there.
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. ~Author Unknown
Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
EricOntheFly  
#16 Posted : Monday, September 19, 2016 7:12:05 PM(UTC)
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Great report. I was up there over there weekend. The wading is difficult in some of those rivers but the scenery is second to none. Caught lots of brookies and chased around some pink salmon at the mouths but couldn't get any to take my flies. If I can ever figure out how to upload photos I'll try to share a few.
shebs  
#17 Posted : Monday, September 19, 2016 8:13:01 PM(UTC)
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EricOntheFly wrote:
Great report. I was up there over there weekend. The wading is difficult in some of those rivers but the scenery is second to none. Caught lots of brookies and chased around some pink salmon at the mouths but couldn't get any to take my flies. If I can ever figure out how to upload photos I'll try to share a few.


It is certainly not like the streams around here. I took a couple baths after skating around on the slippery bedrock lol, took most of the week for my body to get over all the falls I took.

As far as photos - best to upload to photobucket or flickr or some other image hosting and then hotlink them.
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. ~Author Unknown
Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
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