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Gurth  
#31 Posted : Monday, January 30, 2017 8:43:55 AM(UTC)
Gurth
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Just to be clear, the one pictured was the 22 inch brood. I didn't photograph the 11 incher. Thanks though. Was a beauty for sure.


So I emailed a DNR contact that I have who happens to be the fish biologist for the territory that includes the water* where I got the rainbow yesterday.

Here's what I asked:

"I have a couple of rainbow trout questions that I hope you'll take a moment to answer.

I caught the 18 inch rainbow in the attached photo today on ______ river* near the _______________________.

Most guess that this is released brood stock and I'd tend to agree.

The only caveat is that it's tail fin was completely intact. It didn't show the wearing off on the bottom that other brood stock rainbows that I've caught had. There was no visible damage.

Your thoughts? Most likely a brood or could a released fingerling get to this size in ________ river*?

Are brood stock released at this time of year coz people are reporting getting big rainbows right now in the driftless area?

How long are brood stock likely to survive once released?"



His response:


"The last year small fingerling rainbows were stocked in that river* was 2012. A released fingerling could get to that size so it is possible that the fish you caught could be from a previous small fingerling stocking. If the tail fin and pectoral fins were all intact then it is more likely a small fingerling. The brood stock are released in September and October.

Brood stock can survive a few years post stocking. They most likely will move out of an area after stocking.
"



Interesting stuff.

I'm very interested in the ecology of all of this - beyond just fishing tactics and results.

And yes, rainbows are stocked in Wisconsin and they can reproduce, but the success rate is very, very low.


In conclusion, the most likely scenario is that I caught a rainbow that was placed as a fingerling 5+ years ago. VERY cool. Not just coz it's a nice fish, but because it's a fish management success story and a good sign for our streams and rivers.

Don't get me wrong, I'm happy to catch broods (still gotta hook em and land em) although I won't wait at the bridge for the truck to pull up. It's just neat thinking that yesterday's rainbow was foraging about for at least 5 years before we crossed paths.


* Being all secretive to protect that rainbow. BigGrin

PM if you care to know the location.

Edited by user Monday, January 30, 2017 1:22:38 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
Pete  
#32 Posted : Monday, January 30, 2017 11:06:57 AM(UTC)
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William Schlafer wrote:
I know they stock Rainbows in MN & Iowa. Always wondered if some of those found there way down to the Mississippi and then up into SW Wisconsin trout streams. I've been repeatedly told that Rainbows don't reproduce naturally in Wisco streams (for some reason) but that 11" Rainbow Gurth caught makes me wonder. Nice looking fish.


-Bill



There are a handful of streams in central Wisconsin-Waushara Co. comes to mind and there may be others-that hold naturally reproducing rainbows. It can be done.

What you mentioned about rainbows stocked in MN and IA moving into SW WI via the Mississippi: it's certainly a possibility during all but the warmest times of the year. Rainbows are known for wandering, as the biologist pointed out in his reply to Gurth; the ones used for stocking must have some steelhead genes in them, that make them want to swim long distances. It's one thing to stock a lake or pond with them so that kids can catch them; put them in a stream with no barriers and they are unlikely to stay put for long.
Gurth  
#33 Posted : Monday, January 30, 2017 11:24:07 AM(UTC)
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I also have read somewhere that stocked fish tend to get pushed out of the areas where they are placed by the resident (big) trout. Or if they are more aggressive, they can push some residents out.

Probably another reason that the broods move along as they are likely pretty docile having spent most of their time in close quarters - something a big brown near a bridge isn't gonna put up with.


Edited by user Monday, January 30, 2017 11:34:24 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
Gurth  
#34 Posted : Saturday, February 11, 2017 7:11:08 PM(UTC)
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Absolutely gorgeous out there today.

15 browns, 1 brookie and 1 rainbow.


Easily the best day of 2017 so far as the fish were active.

The brookie was small, but notable coz it's the first for me on the water I fished today.

Of the browns, got one 16 incher, two 15 inchers, one 14 incher and the rest were 9-12 inchers.

Great day..
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
Gurth  
#35 Posted : Saturday, February 11, 2017 8:29:37 PM(UTC)
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Oh yeah and my rainbow was a 20 or so inch brood.

UserPostedImage

Yeesh - another ugly bow, but it fought really well and I almost slipped into the river trying to net it. Rubber waders suck on muddy banks.Laugh

Later...

My buddy got a nice 14-16 inch non-brood rainbow.

UserPostedImage


And yeah... he's new to trout fishing and our c&r culture and I'm working on the keep 'em wet part, so apologies although I've seen other photos herein of fish lying on the grass. Anyway...

Wanted to post the photo as there was some question earlier in the thread about stocking and rainbows that grow up in the stream. Well, there's one that grew up from a fingerling or unlikely, was hatched naturally.
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
Revolver1  
#36 Posted : Sunday, February 12, 2017 7:48:38 AM(UTC)
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Gurth wrote:
Oh yeah and my rainbow was a 20 or so inch brood.

UserPostedImage

Yeesh - another ugly bow, but it fought really well and I almost slipped into the river trying to net it. Rubber waders suck on muddy banks.Laugh




Hey, I'm the guy you talked to in the lot. I'm glad you got your rainbow yesterday. You didn't see my phone, did you? LOL.

Here's a photo of the bow I got yesterday. I assume it's a brooder.

UserPostedImage
Gurth  
#37 Posted : Sunday, February 12, 2017 9:47:43 AM(UTC)
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^ Sorry man. We all kept our eyes open too, but no dice.


Nice fish for you too.

Edited by user Sunday, February 12, 2017 9:49:21 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
WI-fly  
#38 Posted : Sunday, February 12, 2017 10:09:12 AM(UTC)
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Pete wrote:
William Schlafer wrote:
I know they stock Rainbows in MN & Iowa. Always wondered if some of those found there way down to the Mississippi and then up into SW Wisconsin trout streams. I've been repeatedly told that Rainbows don't reproduce naturally in Wisco streams (for some reason) but that 11" Rainbow Gurth caught makes me wonder. Nice looking fish.


-Bill



There are a handful of streams in central Wisconsin-Waushara Co. comes to mind and there may be others-that hold naturally reproducing rainbows. It can be done.

What you mentioned about rainbows stocked in MN and IA moving into SW WI via the Mississippi: it's certainly a possibility during all but the warmest times of the year. Rainbows are known for wandering, as the biologist pointed out in his reply to Gurth; the ones used for stocking must have some steelhead genes in them, that make them want to swim long distances. It's one thing to stock a lake or pond with them so that kids can catch them; put them in a stream with no barriers and they are unlikely to stay put for long.


Coon Creek in La Crosse County, WI gets some stocker rainbows each summer as we dump extra fish in there for the kids fishing event that is part of Trout Fest. They don't seem to stay put, but I have caught them up and down the Coon system throughout the year. It's always a nice surprise to catch a rainbow in brownie/brookie water.
=============
Curt Rees
Coulee Region Trout Unlimited
Catch fish, have a good time, protect the resource.
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