Driftless Trout Anglers

Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

2 Pages12>
Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
Isurus21  
#1 Posted : Thursday, July 13, 2017 6:53:42 PM(UTC)
Isurus21
Rank: Midge

Joined: 7/17/2016(UTC)
Posts: 10
Location: Chicagoland

Hi,
I'm looking for recommendations for mid-price range lace-up wading boots.
I am shopping for a new pair of waders and I'm graduating to my first pair of stockingfoot waders.
I'm leaning towards LL Bean for the waders since I have a big discount coupon they gave me after a shipping snafu earlier this year.
However, when I checked their website recently, the wading boots I was thinking of getting were out of stock, so now I'm shopping around. I think I am going to go with lace-up boots for the sake of simplicity and ease of repair in the event of a lace breaking.
So I'm seeking recommendations. Orvis looks like they have some decent boots, at a decent price, but again, I'm open to recommendations.
I am going to get rubber soles with studs, and if I get to fish 12 times a year, I'll be lucky, for what its worth...

Also... I recently discovered that the waders I've been using- breathable bootfoot waterfowl hunting waders from Cabelas- (which have actually been very good to me, FWIW) have sprung a leak, somewhere down near the left boot (I assume where the fabric is bonded to the rubber). Does anybody have tips for isolating and repairing a wader leak?

Thanks!

Rich.
Sponsor
MikeJuran  
#2 Posted : Friday, July 14, 2017 6:01:52 AM(UTC)
MikeJuran
Rank: Dragon Fly

Joined: 2/13/2012(UTC)
Posts: 1,016
Man
Location: Chaseburg, WI

I have the Simms Freestone wader pants for the Driftless, as chest waders are just too hot during summer for me, no mattter what material they are made of. I have Simms chest waders (freestone also) for bigger rivers where I need to go past my waist line. I have had both cheap and expensive boots. My current pair which is holding up well is the Pantagonia Ultralights ... . Bought the boots from Mat/Geri at Driftless Angler ...I think they are about $189? Mat's been wearing them as well, which tells me something. He said the original Pantagonia boot had some issues, but he's been wearing his for two years now (as a guide) with no issues. THey are light, good sole, good support and a great boot for hiking Driftless streams.

mj
Fly Me A River
Hoggies  
#3 Posted : Friday, July 14, 2017 6:37:00 AM(UTC)
Hoggies
Rank: Caddis Fly

Joined: 3/7/2017(UTC)
Posts: 129
Man
United States
Location: SE MN

Thanks: 5 times
Was thanked: 6 time(s) in 6 post(s)
If that leak looks like it's from a failed seam, cabela's will probably do a warranty return for store credit (especially if you have a receipt). They have some good deals on Simms boots right now, but only if you're a size 8. I have the cabela's ultralight wading boots (lug sole, they have spots for studs, but there weren't any included) and I like them pretty well.
rschmidt  
#4 Posted : Friday, July 14, 2017 7:08:31 AM(UTC)
rschmidt
Rank: May Fly

Joined: 1/16/2015(UTC)
Posts: 474
Location: West WI

Thanks: 16 times
Was thanked: 35 time(s) in 31 post(s)
I have been using Simms Freestones this year. Comfortable and durable so far (30 outings) Replaced boot laces already. My first year with stocking foot waders and boots. Can't believe I waited this long. The set up is so much more stable than any booted waders I have used. The LL Bean 99$ flyweight is a good wader for the price with 100% warranty, but keep in mind - waders and boots are fungible whether you pay 100 or 500$. They will only last so long. I really like the light weight Cabelas 4 ply I have and I may exchange them. Not from the barb wire hole I patched, but for wearing out a foot booty.

On booted wader leaks - I am an expert! Hahaha. You need to take fully dry waders. Sprinkle corn starch or baby powder on the legs and then fill the inside with water and check for the leaks. They will be easy to see with powder. Use a sturdy tripod or hanging apparatus as waders with water in them get heavy quick! I use a black sharpie to mark the leaks and then silicone aka aquaseal the leaks. If you have a boot leak - heel, upper or sole, you can kiss the waders goodbye, I have never made a successful boot repair. I have actually spliced a complete other set of boots to neoprene waders with a worn out boot - worked for two seasons. If you insist on booted waders, only get a boot with a steel shank in it. Prevents sole and heal problems with leaks.

For early season and steel head I love the warmth and protection from LaCrosse Brushtuffs. 1600g thinsulate in the boots means shorts can be worn underneath in January. The boots are less stable than a stocking foot setup. I will stick with them for the cold stuff though. None of the lightweights, in my special size Woot, would allow for layering and warmth like the Brushtuffs.

Happy Fishing! R
William Schlafer  
#5 Posted : Friday, July 14, 2017 8:08:54 AM(UTC)
William Schlafer
Rank: Super Fly

Joined: 7/24/2011(UTC)
Posts: 3,166
Location: Sussex Wisconsin

Thanks: 62 times
Was thanked: 95 time(s) in 81 post(s)
I've got four seasons in now on my Simms Freestone boots and they're still probably good for at least another year. If you're looking for maximum foot protection and ankle support, these are your boots. I also have an inexpensive pair of Cabelas boots that I use as a backup, but you really notice the difference after a couple hours. They're fine for occasional light use, but the Freestones are far superior.

I tried on a pair of Simms Vapor boots which are more like a light hiking boot. Probably more comfortable for that long walk on pavement back to the car, but I felt like they might not hold up as well in brush, rocks and barbed wire like the Freestones.

As I've preached in other posts, spend your money on good boots. In the long run, they will improve your fishing experience far more than any expensive rod or pricey pair of waders.

One other suggestion: always thoroughly clean your boots and waders after each outing. I usually stop at a car wash when I'm finished fishing to hose everything clean and then air dry everything at home. Take the boot laces off and remove the insoles. Be sure to get all the abrasive sand out. Your boots and waders will last a lot longer and it will prevent that nasty funk from building up. Look for a car wash that uses clean water, not recycled grey water. Otherwise you'll end up with a sewage odor in your waders that doesn't go away for awhile.

UserPostedImage


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
ccb1  
#6 Posted : Friday, July 14, 2017 10:02:11 AM(UTC)
ccb1
Rank: Midge

Joined: 1/8/2015(UTC)
Posts: 8
Man
Location: central ia

Thanks: 2 times
Was thanked: 3 time(s) in 2 post(s)
ThumpUp I have a pair of 40 year old from cabelas that i use for ugly wading {steep banks,rapids that loose footing and land on rocks. ect}That I have repaired with shoe goo its cheap and works great. Some of the repairs are 30years old.

After they have dried for awhile look for wet spots that usually the area leaking. If that doesn't work fill with air and listen or use soapy water in spray bottle.
that's mt 2cents

good-luck
Isurus21  
#7 Posted : Monday, July 17, 2017 7:02:55 PM(UTC)
Isurus21
Rank: Midge

Joined: 7/17/2016(UTC)
Posts: 10
Location: Chicagoland

Thanks for the replies, lots of good info.
It sounds like the Simms Freestones have some fans, and I'm not surprised that Patagonia comes recommended. I have a lot of Patagonia gear, and haven't yet found a piece I didn't like.

Does anyone have any experience with Korkers boots? They seem reasonably priced, but I wonder about the durability of their interchangeable soles. They seem like a great idea in theory, but how are they in practice?

Thanks again!

-Rich.
shebs  
#8 Posted : Monday, July 17, 2017 8:10:36 PM(UTC)
shebs
Rank: Stone Fly

Joined: 5/12/2014(UTC)
Posts: 909
Location: Mpls

Thanks: 4 times
Was thanked: 25 time(s) in 21 post(s)
Isurus21 wrote:
Thanks for the replies, lots of good info.
It sounds like the Simms Freestones have some fans, and I'm not surprised that Patagonia comes recommended. I have a lot of Patagonia gear, and haven't yet found a piece I didn't like.

Does anyone have any experience with Korkers boots? They seem reasonably priced, but I wonder about the durability of their interchangeable soles. They seem like a great idea in theory, but how are they in practice?

Thanks again!

-Rich.


I wore through two pairs of korkers in one season. Granted, I fish 2-3 times a week, and often hike 2 or 3 miles a day, but I was not impressed. The steel BOA wires break once you get sand in the twister, which is a given in the driftless. Make sure you don't get the kind with cloth loops for the laces, they break quickly when you tie them tight.
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. ~Author Unknown
Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
stan b  
#9 Posted : Tuesday, July 18, 2017 4:21:57 AM(UTC)
stan b
Rank: Caddis Fly

Joined: 11/29/2016(UTC)
Posts: 223
Man
Location: New Berlin, WI

Thanks: 101 times
Was thanked: 17 time(s) in 12 post(s)
LL Bean~West Branch Wading Boots

https://www.llbean.com/l...fCxNbbktUCFVq-TwodYcMK9g

Edited by user Tuesday, July 18, 2017 4:23:11 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

"So what is big is not always the Trout nor the Deer but the chance, the being there. And what is full is not necessarily the creel nor the freezer, but the memory." ~ Aldo Leopold
Gerrber  
#10 Posted : Friday, July 21, 2017 6:22:51 AM(UTC)
Gerrber
Rank: Midge

Joined: 6/8/2015(UTC)
Posts: 48
Location: Caseys Breakfast pizza/St.Paul

I'll toss my hat in for the two Simms products mentioned. I'm on my third year of owning a pair of the Vaportread boots, they've got a lot of miles on them and I don't treat them as well as I should (cleaning and proper drying after use). I also use a pair of the Headwaters boots for work. I've only had the headwaters boots for 6 or so months. To echo there product descriptions I find the headwaters to be a bit stiffer and more supportive in the ankle and slightly heavier, while the vapor is lighter and more enjoyable to walk in. Ive used korkers in the past and was fairly disappointed with the durability they provided, albeit they were a cheaper style they fell apart in a year or so.

As others have said, invest in good boots, they're worth it.
Users browsing this topic
2 Pages12>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF.NET | YAF.NET © 2003-2018, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 0.881 seconds.