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rschmidt  
#1 Posted : Sunday, January 28, 2018 12:16:40 AM(UTC)
rschmidt
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Shebs and I began the day drooling over brook trout possibilities today, but confronted adversity. While upstream the water appeared clear and ice free, the best spots known to us on the stream for brookie hunting were frozen over. Plan B, off to another stream and thankfully no major ice cover. The water was clear, but cold, likely under 40F. The process started off with enthusiasm. After three hours of a bone chilling, toe numbing walk in the water with no fish hitting, bing! bang! boom! As has occurred at most outings this early season, the late afternoon provided some hot action. Must be some type of midge or nymph hatch that turns the fish on.

Bing! A 16" thick brown.
UserPostedImage

Bang!! A 20 1/4" fat ass big headed google eyed brown. My first 20 of the season and my third fish 18 or better in January. Drool
UserPostedImage

Boom!!! Shebs cashes in on fierce 15", 2.5#er brownie.
UserPostedImage

In the course of an hour, 10 more fish, all browns. Like it began, it was over Sad

By this point my toes were numb and I had enough RollEyes

Shebs kept on fishing and I got a message about 8 more fish to hand.

Good day folks, a very good day!

Happy Fishing!

Ron

Edited by user Sunday, January 28, 2018 12:35:45 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user thanked rschmidt for this useful post.
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shebs  
#2 Posted : Sunday, January 28, 2018 1:33:18 AM(UTC)
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Damnit Ron I'm not taking you on my private stretches anymore, you always outfish me when I do the door knocking Razz
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. ~Author Unknown
Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
rschmidt  
#3 Posted : Sunday, January 28, 2018 1:38:53 AM(UTC)
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I knocked on the frozen stream land owner!. Hahahha
George  
#4 Posted : Friday, February 2, 2018 3:09:24 PM(UTC)
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I'm noticing much slower fishing on the warmer days. I am doing much better on days that don't get above freezing. My guess is the snow melt is cooling the water and shutting them down. What do you guys think? Does this sound right?

Is the water warmer in the lower parts of watersheds? Maybe my focus should be in those parts of the streams.
Guillermo  
#5 Posted : Friday, February 2, 2018 3:33:01 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: George Go to Quoted Post
I'm noticing much slower fishing on the warmer days. I am doing much better on days that don't get above freezing. My guess is the snow melt is cooling the water and shutting them down. What do you guys think? Does this sound right?

Is the water warmer in the lower parts of watersheds? Maybe my focus should be in those parts of the streams.


You hit it right on the head. Snowmelt can shut down fishing instantly. As far as the water temperature goes, anywhere spring discharge flows in will have warmer water in the winter. Generally, the upper part of watersheds tend to be warmer in the winter than the lower parts. I witnessed this at the beginning of January. Most middle and lower reaches I checked were frozen and unfishable, but the same creeks in their upper reaches were wide open in most cases. That's the only reason I was able to catch fish opening weekend.
rschmidt  
#6 Posted : Monday, February 5, 2018 4:48:55 PM(UTC)
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Agreed. Coldest spots in summer become the warmest spots early season. Ground water springs pumping at 40ish degrees are the best spots to fish early season. Melt off, ice or snow will cool water. Even when the water is cold, if the water temp is going upward, even a little half degree, trout will feed. When it is cooling even a half degree, trout sleep or do whatever the hell they do when not on the prowl. Hahaha. R
George  
#7 Posted : Monday, February 5, 2018 7:29:15 PM(UTC)
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Wow, I never looked at it that way. I always thought to fish the lower parts of the creek in the winter due to the water warming along the way but like a dummy, I wasn't thinking about the residual runoff throughout................. upper sections this weekend for sure.

Thanks fellas - that is great advice.
George
William Schlafer  
#8 Posted : Monday, February 5, 2018 8:04:06 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
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45-55 degree water is ideal for inland water Trout, and are most likely to be feeding in that range.

The stress of catching a Trout above 70 degrees has been shown to be lethal due to decreased oxygen levels. What Trout most want are stable temps. That's why ground water seeps and springs are great spots to fish in the winter. Because the ground water is typically warmer than the air during this time those areas are also more likely to be ice free. During the summer heat, those same cold water sources are a respite for Trout when the water temperature soars.

In Jay Ford Thurston's books he describes how even a 1 degree rise in water temperature (in the 45-55 degree range) can trigger Trout to begin feeding. He has data gathered over decades to back that up.

Carry a thermometer, look for cold water springs, and you'll catch more fish!


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
madguy30  
#9 Posted : Monday, February 5, 2018 8:47:50 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: William Schlafer Go to Quoted Post
45-55 degree water is ideal for inland water Trout, and are most likely to be feeding in that range.

The stress of catching a Trout above 70 degrees has been shown to be lethal due to decreased oxygen levels. What Trout most want are stable temps. That's why ground water seeps and springs are great spots to fish in the winter. Because the ground water is typically warmer than the air during this time those areas are also more likely to be ice free. During the summer heat, those same cold water sources are a respite for Trout when the water temperature soars.

In Jay Ford Thurston's books he describes how even a 1 degree rise in water temperature (in the 45-55 degree range) can trigger Trout to begin feeding. He has data gathered over decades to back that up.

Carry a thermometer, look for cold water springs, and you'll catch more fish!


-Bill


I don't carry a thermometer any more but I think 40 degrees used to be the magic number for when I'd start to see a bug here or there and fish start to rise. At 39, fish may still bite but no bugs.

Usually April is when I start to see fish really go nuts on the surface and I wonder if that 45-55 area is where the temps have gotten to at some point.

My favorite part of the hobby is seeing all of this stuff happen and standing right in the middle of it.
rschmidt  
#10 Posted : Tuesday, February 6, 2018 3:22:19 AM(UTC)
rschmidt
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Bill's got the reference material there, but I have had plenty of sub 40 degree water good days, as long as it warming and melt was not too aggressive. I have only measured temp in one place at it was 1.6C ~ 35F. No fish there and frozen in some parts. Have done pretty well 36 and above, 40 is money. Happy Fishing! Ron
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