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JGF  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, February 14, 2018 6:25:24 PM(UTC)
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Good article from a long-term study in Massachusetts. Really cool the way they've done this study.

A bit from the beginning of the article,

Quote:
Results from a 15-year study of factors affecting population levels of Eastern brook trout in the face of climate change show that high summer air temperatures have a large influence, in particular on the smallest fry and eggs, which are most important to wild trout abundance in streams.

Co-author Ben Letcher, fisheries biologist at the U.S. Geological Survey and adjunct faculty in environmental conservation at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, says, "It took years of sampling four streams and tracking more than 15,000 individual fish, but we feel we can account for about 90 percent of the yearly variation in abundance. The bottom line is that high summer temperatures are bad. That is unfortunate because summer air temperature is expected to increase with climate change and extreme rain is also expected to increase, especially in the spring when vulnerable eggs are hatching and fry are emerging."

"Those two things are heading in the wrong direction for this particular species," he adds. Letcher and his colleagues predict that if climate warming proceeds as projected and the trout don't evolve, in as soon as 15 years these sentinel fish of cold water streams could be gone from the study stream. "If they can evolve, they may at least double their ability to stay in the stream," he notes.


https://phys.org/news/2015-11-trout-climate-pressure-factor.html
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Guillermo  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, February 14, 2018 6:46:02 PM(UTC)
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Interesting question whether they can evolve or not. There are some who believe the Brookies in a certain Langlade County stream have done just that to deal with summer water temps that have been around 70 for a while now. The stream is loaded with Brookies, and big ones too. 14-15 inchers fairly common with a few up to 17-18 taken every year.
NBrevitz  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, February 14, 2018 8:25:31 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Guillermo Go to Quoted Post
Interesting question whether they can evolve or not. There are some who believe the Brookies in a certain Langlade County stream have done just that to deal with summer water temps that have been around 70 for a while now. The stream is loaded with Brookies, and big ones too. 14-15 inchers fairly common with a few up to 17-18 taken every year.


I think some of the N Shore populations are similar, a lot of the better streams up there can run pretty warm. I’ve heard the Rainbows in the Delaware River are similar in this respect.

This is why connectivity in watersheds is so important, we need to allow fish to reach cool headwater areas during hot spells.
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
thanks 1 user thanked NBrevitz for this useful post.
s.t.fanatic on 2/21/2018(UTC)
Guillermo  
#4 Posted : Thursday, February 15, 2018 5:41:55 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: NBrevitz Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: Guillermo Go to Quoted Post
Interesting question whether they can evolve or not. There are some who believe the Brookies in a certain Langlade County stream have done just that to deal with summer water temps that have been around 70 for a while now. The stream is loaded with Brookies, and big ones too. 14-15 inchers fairly common with a few up to 17-18 taken every year.


I think some of the N Shore populations are similar, a lot of the better streams up there can run pretty warm. I’ve heard the Rainbows in the Delaware River are similar in this respect.

This is why connectivity in watersheds is so important, we need to allow fish to reach cool headwater areas during hot spells.



Exactly. Couple that with making sure streams are shaded from above appropriately. Another thing to remember is that all these tag alders along our freestone streams were not originally there and do not provide any benefit to the fish. To the contrary actually, they just end up eroding the banks and choking out the stream over time. Those came in after the clear cutting took place. I'm glad to see a lot of the work being done now regarding alder removal and stream narrowing. Maybe planting trees to replicate the old growth would be beneficial as well in ensuring water temperatures don't rise the way they're predicted to.
NBrevitz  
#5 Posted : Thursday, February 15, 2018 6:18:51 AM(UTC)
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Yep, canopy is a huge deal and I think people tend to forget that. The nice thing about White Pines is that they absolutely can come back if helped along.
As for stream narrowing, I agree, but with plantings as well. This is what makes me wonder a bit about some, not all, HI projects in Driftless. Water velocity is great for keeping temps down, but shade and stabile banks are important too, and I have yet to see an HI project in Pierce County involving tree plantings. Get all of that working together, combined with some hopeful adaptation on the part of the Brookies in the short term, and we could keep them around. We're far from the southern end of their range. There are Brook Trout in Georgia of all places, and not even that high up relatively speaking.
I've literally seen this first hand. My family owns property on a small creek in N Michigan, and the Brookies all but vanished after a beaver infestation killed off the canopy. We re-planted cedars, and within 10 years they started coming back hard. We've seen fish up to 15" in this creek, which runs at about 3 cfs and still lacks deep pools for much of its length. Shade is a huge factor. I know its one sample, but I've seen this still flawed stream largely recover off an investment of less than $1000. Something to think about for those HI Sections that get sun baked half of July. I'd volunteer to plant them, no questions asked.
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madguy30  
#6 Posted : Sunday, February 18, 2018 8:35:52 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: NBrevitz Go to Quoted Post
Yep, canopy is a huge deal and I think people tend to forget that. The nice thing about White Pines is that they absolutely can come back if helped along.
As for stream narrowing, I agree, but with plantings as well. This is what makes me wonder a bit about some, not all, HI projects in Driftless. Water velocity is great for keeping temps down, but shade and stabile banks are important too, and I have yet to see an HI project in Pierce County involving tree plantings. Get all of that working together, combined with some hopeful adaptation on the part of the Brookies in the short term, and we could keep them around. We're far from the southern end of their range. There are Brook Trout in Georgia of all places, and not even that high up relatively speaking.
I've literally seen this first hand. My family owns property on a small creek in N Michigan, and the Brookies all but vanished after a beaver infestation killed off the canopy. We re-planted cedars, and within 10 years they started coming back hard. We've seen fish up to 15" in this creek, which runs at about 3 cfs and still lacks deep pools for much of its length. Shade is a huge factor. I know its one sample, but I've seen this still flawed stream largely recover off an investment of less than $1000. Something to think about for those HI Sections that get sun baked half of July. I'd volunteer to plant them, no questions asked.


Good take...I was around Camp Creek recently and was thinking about a section that used to be really fun because of the challenge of casting around the vegetation. Lots of fish there too.

I went there one spring to find it totally carved out and bricked up for 'banks'. Boring fishing and I have to wonder how exposed those fish are to threats and heat. Also after the change I saw fewer fish. Haven't been back so not sure of the fish now but not all that interested either.
s.t.fanatic  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, February 21, 2018 3:18:53 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: madguy30 Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: NBrevitz Go to Quoted Post
Yep, canopy is a huge deal and I think people tend to forget that. The nice thing about White Pines is that they absolutely can come back if helped along.
As for stream narrowing, I agree, but with plantings as well. This is what makes me wonder a bit about some, not all, HI projects in Driftless. Water velocity is great for keeping temps down, but shade and stabile banks are important too, and I have yet to see an HI project in Pierce County involving tree plantings. Get all of that working together, combined with some hopeful adaptation on the part of the Brookies in the short term, and we could keep them around. We're far from the southern end of their range. There are Brook Trout in Georgia of all places, and not even that high up relatively speaking.
I've literally seen this first hand. My family owns property on a small creek in N Michigan, and the Brookies all but vanished after a beaver infestation killed off the canopy. We re-planted cedars, and within 10 years they started coming back hard. We've seen fish up to 15" in this creek, which runs at about 3 cfs and still lacks deep pools for much of its length. Shade is a huge factor. I know its one sample, but I've seen this still flawed stream largely recover off an investment of less than $1000. Something to think about for those HI Sections that get sun baked half of July. I'd volunteer to plant them, no questions asked.


Good take...I was around Camp Creek recently and was thinking about a section that used to be really fun because of the challenge of casting around the vegetation. Lots of fish there too.

I went there one spring to find it totally carved out and bricked up for 'banks'. Boring fishing and I have to wonder how exposed those fish are to threats and heat. Also after the change I saw fewer fish. Haven't been back so not sure of the fish now but not all that interested either.



I know exactly what you mean. I cant and wont speculate its from lac of shade but Garvin brook in S.E. MN. was a lot better before the most recent 2 habitat projects (in the project area).

I'd like to see cotton wood trees being planted. When it comes to planting trees many fail to look long term. The thing about trees is they grow, a lot. An oak or cotton wood that will reach a mature height of over 50' need not be planted any closer to the stream than that height. If planted that far away from the stream it will never be washed out and when even halfway mature will provide many hours of thermal protection. The sun is only directly overhead for a limited amount of time every day. I think most of you know how much i loath habitat projects but it would have a much different feel if they would use some well thought out lowland tree species planted in proper locations.

Edited by user Wednesday, February 21, 2018 3:20:59 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

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