Driftless Trout Anglers

Welcome Guest! To enable all features please Login or Register.

Notification

Icon
Error

3 Pages123>
Options
Go to last post Go to first unread
KruddyTFB  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 4:00:15 AM(UTC)
KruddyTFB
Rank: Midge

Joined: 6/19/2018(UTC)
Posts: 10
Man
United States

Thanks: 4 times
Was thanked: 1 time(s) in 1 post(s)
Hi, everybody.

As I said in my introduction post, I just got back into trout fishing last year. I started watching some YouTube videos and asking questions in the comments sections and Wisconsin Trout Fishing guy suggested this forum to me. The majority of the fishing I have done has been in two specific streams that are closer to my home, but this past weekend I ventured into a stream that I have never fished before. The first stretch was fairly wide, very shallow, and VERY rocky and produced a single 5 inch brookie and the second was too deep to walk. I eventually went back to the creek that I have spent the most hours on and had decent luck, including missing a big one that peeled drag and spit the hook during some impressive acrobatics.

Back to my point.

I know that the best way to discover new places to fish is to put the waders on and explore. But I have more than an hour drive to get into the northern reaches of the driftless area where my options become much more abundant. Does anybody have any advise on how to narrow a search when trying to find a new fishable stretch of water?

Thanks,

Justin
Sponsor
Gurth  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 5:02:31 AM(UTC)
Gurth
Rank: Stone Fly

Joined: 11/7/2016(UTC)
Posts: 861
Man
Location: Madison

Thanks: 40 times
Was thanked: 62 time(s) in 49 post(s)
What's your location?

Where are you striking out from?


EDIT: Oops... never mind. Saw your other post. WAY outside of my territory.

Pick a stream... use the search feature on this forum... Google it... search for DNR intel...

Build a composite based on all of the intel you can find and hit the ones that seem most promising.

There's a couple of pretty famous ones within that northern part of the Driftless. Couldn't hurt to hit those.


Participate herein and help will come your way but you usually have to put in some time first.


.

Edited by user Wednesday, June 27, 2018 5:08:34 AM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
thanks 1 user thanked Gurth for this useful post.
KruddyTFB on 6/27/2018(UTC)
shebs  
#3 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 6:56:49 AM(UTC)
shebs
Rank: Stone Fly

Joined: 5/12/2014(UTC)
Posts: 898
Location: Mpls

Thanks: 4 times
Was thanked: 22 time(s) in 18 post(s)
Well, the unfortunate truth is that you're probably going to have to drive an hour plus to find good water. The well known fisheries are usually well known because they're good, and the good ones that aren't well known are usually hard work to get to or find in the first place. There really isn't a secret to finding them short of hours logged and tough days. If there is good water in your area, people aren't likely to advertise it. I haven't found any, myself, but that doesn't mean it isn't there.
A bad day of fishing is better than a good day of work. ~Author Unknown
Modern Translation, with respect for the Notorious B.I.G. : "Fuck Money, Get Fishes"
rschmidt  
#4 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 10:23:38 AM(UTC)
rschmidt
Rank: May Fly

Joined: 1/16/2015(UTC)
Posts: 460
Location: West WI

Thanks: 15 times
Was thanked: 30 time(s) in 26 post(s)
Get out and explore. From where u are r are gonna have to drive a ways. Also that WTF guy is a cool cat! Ron
KruddyTFB  
#5 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:00:05 PM(UTC)
KruddyTFB
Rank: Midge

Joined: 6/19/2018(UTC)
Posts: 10
Man
United States

Thanks: 4 times
Was thanked: 1 time(s) in 1 post(s)
I don't mind logging a few hours on the road. It's just nice to have a little more confidence in the destination. There is one creek about 15 minutes from me that is listed by the DNR and when I got there it was about 3 feet wide and 4 inches deep.

Another place I have caught several fish only gives me about 10 minutes until I can't get any further up stream.

I was mainly asking to avoid situations like this. Obviously, catching fish is a plus. But I enjoy the scenery and the isolation with or without a lot of bites.
weiliwen  
#6 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 1:11:27 PM(UTC)
weiliwen
Rank: May Fly

Joined: 4/16/2014(UTC)
Posts: 314
Man
United States
Location: Lincolnshire, Illinois

Thanks: 76 times
Was thanked: 24 time(s) in 19 post(s)
The first thing to do is to find streams that should have trout.

Wisconsin, at least, makes this easy on their DNR site, which has maps of all counties with Class I, II, and III streams listed. I print out these maps (I use my company's plotter printer to make 'em big, don't tell them!), then cross check against the Wisconsin Gazetteer and the Map Guide to Improved Trout Waters of Wisconsin. Once I've found the streams I want to look at, time to jump in the car and head there. There is only one way to do this: Drive along the nearest road to find access points and easements from the three resources I mentioned above. Then start exploring!

As the summer progresses, the smaller streams can get pretty overgrown. I'm not even in the top 100 fishermen on this web site, but I can tell you that if you can see the water, the trout can see you. Casting a fly or spinner into a narrow creek from 25 feet away is tough any way you look at it. I usually wade into the creek and cast as far upstream as I can. Strange to think a 25 foot cast is needed on a stream 5 feet across, but sometimes it is. Stealth is key, if not wading. In those cases, I sometimes blind cast, that is I can't even see the fly hit the water. And in summer, generally speaking - and there are exceptions to every rule - fishing while the sun is directly on the water is pretty tough; I have most of my luck early and late. Those same overgrown streams can be good for mousing in the evenings, by the way. That's one reason why I really like winter and early spring fishing best; you can fish in the middle of the day.

I hope this helps. Like I said, many or most of the folks who are on this site are a damn sight better than I am so they will hopefully also chime in.
Bob Williams, "Weiliwen"
thanks 1 user thanked weiliwen for this useful post.
KruddyTFB on 6/27/2018(UTC)
William Schlafer  
#7 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 2:29:34 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
Rank: Super Fly

Joined: 7/24/2011(UTC)
Posts: 3,134
Location: Sussex Wisconsin

Thanks: 49 times
Was thanked: 82 time(s) in 69 post(s)
Count yourself lucky you only have a one hour drive - it's five to six hours round trip for me, which can make for a very long day of driving.

If you're coming from Illinois (I'm guessing) you do have good options below the Wisconsin river that are within a reasonable drive. The problem is that many of those streams are very popular and will be jammed up on weekends. Fish mid-week if possible. As mentioned by someone earlier, check out the WDNR Website for a county by county list of Trout streams. But remember this... just because the WDNR says a stream is Class I Trout water, it doesn't mean it's an excellent stream to fish. Class I just means the stream has all the ingredients for natural reproduction of Trout.

Streams with easements will allow you to walk the banks, which is much easier than wading. If you find a stream you want to fish that doesn't have an easement, try knocking on a land owners door. Many times they will give you permission if you ask nicely. Be sure to ask where they want you to enter and exit their property, and where the best place to leave your vehicle. An offer of caught Trout or maybe some Spotted Cow beer can go a long ways in cow country.

Summer is the worst time to go exploring. Tall weeds, biting bugs, wild parsnip, nettles and the god awful heat make it difficult, if not impossible to fish during the warm months. But if you do, here's a tip. Right after a big storm is an excellent time to fish when the weeds are high. The temporary high water will flatten the weeds along the banks and once the water goes down, you can walk the banks for a least a few days before the weeds pop back up. Post flood fishing is usually pretty good too as the fish are energized and hungry. Early morning and early evening are usually the best times to fish in the summer. Check the water temps with a thermometer. The stress of catching a Trout in water over 70 degrees can be fatal to them.

On the popular streams, seek out the furthest upstream spots, or the smaller tribs feeding off the main stream. For some reason, most of the tourist fishing crowd seems to avoid those places, which ironically can often be the best.

Good luck!
-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
thanks 1 user thanked William Schlafer for this useful post.
KruddyTFB on 6/27/2018(UTC)
Gurth  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 2:44:36 PM(UTC)
Gurth
Rank: Stone Fly

Joined: 11/7/2016(UTC)
Posts: 861
Man
Location: Madison

Thanks: 40 times
Was thanked: 62 time(s) in 49 post(s)
There are no good options below the Wisconsin River.

Stop messin' with him. Flapper
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
William Schlafer  
#9 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 2:45:09 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
Rank: Super Fly

Joined: 7/24/2011(UTC)
Posts: 3,134
Location: Sussex Wisconsin

Thanks: 49 times
Was thanked: 82 time(s) in 69 post(s)
Oops...

Just re-read your post and it sounds like you're coming to the DA from up points north, not Illinois. A good option is to venture to Viroqua and stop at the Driftless Angler Fly Shop and talk to Mat & Jeri (the owners). They're super friendly folk and can give you some tips on streams to try in the area. Be sure to buy something from the shop in return. Most places won't give out info like the do.

I'm told Lund's Fly Shop in River Falls is pretty good also, although I've never been there. They may be able to steer you to some local streams. I'm told there's some good options in Dunn, Buffalo and Trempealeau counties. Also the SE corner of Minnesota has some fine Trout streams. Visit The Winona Fly Factory website for some insight on those waters.


Good luck.
-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
thanks 1 user thanked William Schlafer for this useful post.
KruddyTFB on 6/27/2018(UTC)
William Schlafer  
#10 Posted : Wednesday, June 27, 2018 2:46:15 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
Rank: Super Fly

Joined: 7/24/2011(UTC)
Posts: 3,134
Location: Sussex Wisconsin

Thanks: 49 times
Was thanked: 82 time(s) in 69 post(s)
Originally Posted by: Gurth Go to Quoted Post
There are no good options below the Wisconsin River.

Stop messin' with him. Flapper



Well, they're mostly drainage ditches and carp water, but a guy has to start somewhere. Smile


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
Users browsing this topic
3 Pages123>
Forum Jump  
You cannot post new topics in this forum.
You cannot reply to topics in this forum.
You cannot delete your posts in this forum.
You cannot edit your posts in this forum.
You cannot create polls in this forum.
You cannot vote in polls in this forum.

Powered by YAF.NET | YAF.NET © 2003-2018, Yet Another Forum.NET
This page was generated in 1.126 seconds.