Driftless Trout Anglers

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billybigbilly  
#1 Posted : Wednesday, August 15, 2018 9:41:52 PM(UTC)
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I went fishing this morning at a stream close to where I go to college. This stream is marginal water with the only spring input being in the lower section which I fished. As I fished I was surprised by the lethargic behavior of the fish. In most streams even in broad daylight I see fish chase my lure and move pretty quickly. but today they seemed to look at it and say
UserPostedImage
and then follow it slowly up to my feet and then swim away unafraid. I never seen anything like it before. they seemed to just follow each other and not even care I was there. They only spooked when I got real close to them.
It's been hot out but I was still out pretty early so I don't know if its from the temperature but has anyone else experienced lazy summer trout?


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Guillermo  
#2 Posted : Wednesday, August 15, 2018 11:49:35 PM(UTC)
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When the water temp hits 65 or above fish tend to get lethargic. Even if you can find active fish under those conditions, it really isn't wise to catch them as the fight might cause them to die because they're already stressed from the warm water. A good rule of thumb is to avoid trout fishing when the water hits that mark.

Edited by user Wednesday, August 15, 2018 11:50:41 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

thanks 1 user thanked Guillermo for this useful post.
s.t.fanatic on 8/17/2018(UTC)
Snogan  
#3 Posted : Thursday, August 16, 2018 4:46:43 PM(UTC)
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Ya, it's definitely this mid-August heat, the fish are moving less and less to take lures or baits presented to them, at least during the day when the sun is at it's highest, I've been having my best luck as soon as legal fishing begins and ends. It's amazing how much the bite shuts down once that Sun gets high in the sky. Hope this helps!
rschmidt  
#4 Posted : Friday, August 17, 2018 1:18:04 AM(UTC)
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Fish will bite and feed in any sunshine, but the will be in cover. No iris means trout seek shade physically. Bites been good in the central west Driftless. R
NBrevitz  
#5 Posted : Friday, August 17, 2018 6:08:12 AM(UTC)
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Depends on the stream. A shaded, ice cold creek will experience lots of hatched during the day when it’s bright and hot, and Trout will be aggressive and hit like gangbusters. HI’d pasture sections are a damn nightmare for midday fishing when it’s hot in my experience. The water heats up and the fish will often loaf in plunge pools or under the bank

I first fished a famous-ish trib of a Root trib during bright mid 60s weather in late April, right after a very late winter finally gave ground. There were still remnants of snow piles along Hwy 90. The fishing was absolutely insane, we landed 80 or so fish chucking spinners in 4 hours of lazy walking and chatting with farmhands. I went back to the same section in late August that year, mile high sky and 95 this time, and caught 1 fish in 4 hours of hardcore fishing. I saw easily 3000 fish in 1.5 miles, and blazing a spinner through a pod of 50 fish that couldn’t see me would bring a tentative follow at best. I even bounced crawlers off their face...

I went back on Opener 2 years ago, got in at 5 AM, and slayed them. My friends fished one farm down at noon and managed 2/3 as many fish despite using bait. 80 degrees put them down a bit even in April!
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
s.t.fanatic  
#6 Posted : Friday, August 17, 2018 1:23:03 PM(UTC)
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It has been to hot to pressure trout this past week, plain and simple. I have been waiting for weather to break to go and chase some hogs but recent pressure has me totally put off and not wanting to even bother. I have a feeling that this hot dry summer is going to totally F my late season tactics.
William Schlafer  
#7 Posted : Friday, August 17, 2018 7:35:11 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: s.t.fanatic Go to Quoted Post
I have a feeling that this hot dry summer is going to totally F my late season tactics.



That's my fear too.

Last year was some of the best fall Trout fishing conditions in the DA in recent memory. Of course, I missed almost all of it due to work travel. This year, between work, illness and hot weather, I haven't been able to get out since early June. I'd hate to see this hotter than normal weather linger into September. I'd love to get a least one decent day of hopper fishing before it ends.


-Bill

“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
billybigbilly  
#8 Posted : Tuesday, August 21, 2018 8:58:58 PM(UTC)
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Thanks for the info everyone, I was suspecting it was the temperature. Does anyone ever use a stream thermometer, and if so any idea on a good but not to expensive one?
JGF  
#9 Posted : Tuesday, August 21, 2018 10:45:36 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: billybigbilly Go to Quoted Post
Thanks for the info everyone, I was suspecting it was the temperature. Does anyone ever use a stream thermometer, and if so any idea on a good but not to expensive one?


Use them pretty often - particularly in mid-summer when there is a decent chance that some streams might be too warm and in winter when a few degrees can make a huge difference.

You can find one pretty much at any flyshop (physical or online) for about $15-20 dollars that will be reasonably accurate. Honestly, ever one I've seen in a fly shop seems to be between $15-20 dollars.
Gurth  
#10 Posted : Tuesday, August 21, 2018 11:32:34 PM(UTC)
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I grabbed a digital one from an aquarium shop for under $20.

Didn't want to use the analog variety as you have to wait for the reading.

Haven't used it yet, but might next winter.
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