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Life of Riley  
#1 Posted : Monday, September 10, 2018 4:53:43 PM(UTC)
Life of Riley
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I've been out troutin' around 20 times this season, beginning in April. I try to fish as many different rivers and spots as possible but some areas I have tried multiple times simply due to sneaking in a quick few hours before or after work. Here's what I have observed so far. I have only used spinners and rapalas.

Fishing is usually good in the early morning. Fishing is excellent on bad weather days, low ceiling, lots of clouds, sprinkles of rain, and sometimes wind. On bright sunny days, there's a few biting early, but the bite gets worse and worse as the day wears on. I have had excellent days in low water and one excellent day when the stream was flowing really high. Water can have some stain and be fishable, but less than 12 inches of visibility has not produced any fish for me. I've tried the evenings a few times and it has never been good for me. Maybe because the water has gotten too warm?

Lots of good info on this board that has helped me along and I'm thankful for. I also started a trout journal to record weather, flow rates, hot lures, etc. etc.



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William Schlafer  
#2 Posted : Monday, September 10, 2018 7:31:38 PM(UTC)
William Schlafer
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Learning the "when to fish" is almost as tricky as the "how."

Water temperature is key. If it's going down, Trout are likely not going to be feeding. Events like snow melt entering streams, or a steadily dropping air temperature will usually shut down the bite every time. Conversely, a degree or two or water temp rise is often enough to trigger Trout to put on the feed bag. Rain events can trigger bites, and shut them down - depending upon conditions. Sun can warm up a stream in the winter and spring triggering the bite, but too much in summertime sends the water temp up to the point were Trout will shut down. Cloud cover on a warm summer day is sometimes advantageous. Generally Trout hate the sun. But the bugs they feed on need the sunlight to trigger hatches.

Decoding the math is tricky, there are so many variables. There are lots of books out there on the subject.


-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
weiliwen  
#3 Posted : Monday, September 10, 2018 7:59:57 PM(UTC)
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Bill's right - temps going up (to about 60 degrees) is a turn on for trout.
Clouds, a bit of mist and drizzle have always been really good for my fishing luck, as have rivers that have a bit of stain on them.

I guess those are observations for any kind of trout, not just browns.

My feeling is that browns don't launch into the air nearly as much as the rainbows and cutthroat of my native Oregon. I guess that's my only observation about browns specifically.

And that there are a ton of variables, which is what I like best about the sport.
Bob Williams, "Weiliwen"
Gurth  
#4 Posted : Tuesday, September 11, 2018 1:29:35 PM(UTC)
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Sure… there are… factors.

I guess hatch dependent fishermen have to watch certain things and time things and I understand that and appreciate their dedication.

For everyone else tho… just go fish.

I always get at least a few trout other than dead of winter or in certain known low density areas. I'll honestly be shocked to my core the next time I go trout fishing on a reasonable stream and get shutout. I think trout are the easiest and most consistent fish to target.

A buddy is a streamer/nymph guy and he gets the same results as me. There's always a few that will bite.

I find lake fishing to be much more dependent on "factors" and will sometimes not bother coz I know that nothing will bite. After a front with high skies, for instance.

(Brown) Trout?

See food.

Eat food.
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OTC_MN  
#5 Posted : Tuesday, September 11, 2018 7:54:54 PM(UTC)
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Lots of good info here...

I think water temp is very important, but what's important about it isn't the specific value, but trends. You can take a temp when you get to the stream, but probably won't know if that's +/- 5 degrees from what it was the day before. I generally think any temp is fine (other than the danger side of warm), as long as it's stable or gradually changing. I think rapid increases or decreases shut fish down. Season also matters I think. I like warm-ups in the spring. I hate them in the fall.

Winter fishing is a good example. I don't care if the water's pretty cold, as long as it isn't getting colder quickly. The 'nice days' for fishing comfort-wise - 35 degrees plus - can screw you because you get frigid meltwater running in and chilling things down. I'd rather fish when it's 25 and stable.

That all having been said, fish when you can. Sometimes you learn a lot more on the tough days. When the weather's bad or the water's murky, I always fall back on "Well, they can't leave..." and figure out a way to catch them. And there *almost* always is a way. Sometimes catching 10 is more than enough to declare victory.
"Our tradition is that of the first man who sneaked away to the creek when the tribe did not really need fish."
- Roderick Haig-Brown
Gurth  
#6 Posted : Tuesday, September 11, 2018 10:21:00 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: OTC_MN Go to Quoted Post
I always fall back on "Well, they can't leave..." and figure out a way to catch them. And there *almost* always is a way. Sometimes catching 10 is more than enough to declare victory.


Agreed. Sometimes 3 or even 1 is a great day depending on factors and what that 1 happens to be.

And I didn't mean to imply that I always get a pile of fish - only that I expect to be able to get at least something every time out coz like you say, I'll figure out a way.

That's what the m-80s are for. Flapper


There are no automatic shutoffs that I know of other than flood stage and dropping water temps in winter - active melt is a killer and I haven't beaten that one too many times.

Full sun? Mid afternoon? Cloudy water? Rain? Wind?

They can all be detrimental at times but they can also seem to be a complete non-factors at other times.

A recent time out was high pressure and not a cloud in the sky. Was in silty/stained water with no shade and full sun at 2:30 PM. Still managed a bunch (at least 10) of browns including a couple bigs (18+) in an hour.

Experience (trial and error) has taught me that browns generally prefer a white lure in silty water and that full sun is far from a game ender. That was the case on that outing as they took the white and largely ignored the gold blade when I alternated.

Oh and when the white doesn't work in those conditions, try orange. Wink


Anyway... (my) point is... just fish. Try new things. Get em to bite.


.

Edited by user Tuesday, September 11, 2018 11:18:44 PM(UTC)  | Reason: Not specified

Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
madguy30  
#7 Posted : Tuesday, September 11, 2018 10:59:25 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Gurth Go to Quoted Post
Sure… there are… factors.

I guess hatch dependent fishermen have to watch certain things and time things and I understand that and appreciate their dedication.

For everyone else tho… just go fish.

I always get at least a few trout other than dead of winter or in certain known low density areas. I'll honestly be shocked to my core the next time I go trout fishing on a reasonable stream and get shutout. I think trout are the easiest and most consistent fish to target.

A buddy is a streamer/nymph guy and he gets the same results as me. There's always a few that will bite.

I find lake fishing to be much more dependent on "factors" and will sometimes not bother coz I know that nothing will bite. After a front with high skies, for instance.

(Brown) Trout?

See food.

Eat food.


Ha, I fly fish and this is still how I go about it. Fish rising? Griffith's Gnat. No fish rising? Dog hair or burlap bead.

No fish biting? Got a good hike in.

I think I've had most fish hit if it's been a long time since a good rain washed insects and worms etc. into the water.
Guillermo  
#8 Posted : Wednesday, September 12, 2018 7:49:52 PM(UTC)
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I'm mostly just a dumb brook trout fishermanSad, but I'll try to apply it to European Coldwater Carp fishing as well. That's browns, and yes it was a joke.Laugh

1) Fishing is almost always going to best in the rain. Not talking thunderstorm or anything here, as you don't want to be out in the lightning, but just a good steady rain and a gray sky. If not rain, then overcast skies alone will do almost as well as the former.

2) Browns rising? They're probably going to be little jerks and require that size 22 midge or ant. There's the occasion when a heavy hatch will cause them to quit acting like snobby little pricks, but I've found them few and far between. Having said that...They can be had just as consistently as brookies provided you adjust your tactics, maybe even more consistently. I've only had a few 50 plus fish days, and they were all browns each and every time.

3) Water temperature...Anything at or above 65 degrees likely means tough fishing and may even be deadly for the trout, more so for brookies. 65 is generally accepted as the cutoff for safe brookie fishing, 70 for browns. 40 is generally the lower mark for when fish will start to get active, unless you find a spring inflow early in the year where the water is in the mid 40's to 50's compared to the surrounding frigid waters.
Gurth  
#9 Posted : Tuesday, September 25, 2018 3:01:19 PM(UTC)
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So yesterday it was full late afternoon sun when i arrived on stream around 4:00. Found a relatively unpressured stretch of a small stream and got 10 browns in the first 45 minutes including a few that were pushing or exceeding 17 inches.

Was using a gold blade black body.

Clouds rolled in and the bite ceased just like that. Tried a few colors until I got a fish on metallic orange. Fished till dusk under the overcast and got a dozen more on the orange and only 1 or 2 more on the gold.

The bite hadn’t shut off. They just didn’t want the shiny gold under overcast skies.

I realize this isn’t directly applicable to fly fishing, but I’m sure different flies could be tried when the bite tails off due to a single change such as light level.
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
thanks 2 users thanked Gurth for this useful post.
weiliwen on 9/25/2018(UTC), William Schlafer on 9/25/2018(UTC)
weiliwen  
#10 Posted : Tuesday, September 25, 2018 3:07:41 PM(UTC)
weiliwen
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Originally Posted by: Gurth Go to Quoted Post
I realize this isn’t directly applicable to fly fishing, but I’m sure different flies could be tried when the bite tails off due to a single change such as light level.


But it is applicable to fishing overall, and that's the point of this whole web site (and why I like it so much). Reading about spinner fishing and the on-stream research folks like you do to find the "pattern" that works is not really different in nature from trying out new flies, just a different type of attractor. I find it very interesting to read about, so thanks!

Bob Williams, "Weiliwen"
thanks 1 user thanked weiliwen for this useful post.
Gurth on 9/25/2018(UTC)
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