Driftless Trout Anglers

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Gurth  
#11 Posted : Sunday, January 20, 2019 3:16:01 PM(UTC)
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One final thought on general handling...

I've heard at least one Rosenbauer (Orvis) podcast where this is talked about and he makes the point that they can tolerate general handling fine.

He talks about stream surveys and what the trout are put through - shocked, netted, measured, revived, released - and how the trout are in "custody" for a good amount of time and that he's never seen any mortality due to this.

“Harvest eaters... release trophies.” -Gurth
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
NBrevitz  
#12 Posted : Sunday, January 20, 2019 9:53:44 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Gurth Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: NBrevitz Go to Quoted Post
...when they should be marketing to trophy hunters that go through 2-3 lures a week...



Laugh

I go through that many in an hour sometimes. Laugh

Rocks gotta eat and the really hungry ones are on the bottoms of deep holes where I can't go to get my lure back.


And I've tried braided and would rather lose the lures.


Oh, that’s happened to me too...😂 I’m quite diligent about getting my lures back, I’ll swim if I have to😂... But yeah, 2-3 a week is maybe wishful thinking on my part...
"I fish because I love to: Because only in the woods can I find solitude without loneliness."
Pete  
#13 Posted : Monday, January 21, 2019 12:40:31 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Guillermo Go to Quoted Post




As for the barbed/pinched debate, I pinch my barbs. I find trout to routinely be harder to unhook with barbed hooks. If a fish is out of the water while being unhooked, I like the reduction in time before release that pinched barbs afford me. But barbed hooks are fully legal and I’ll not criticize anyone who takes a different approach than me.

One last word about hemostats...if you find yourself going through the cheap pairs that are typically made in countries such as Pakistan, search eBay for good deals on some high quality German-made hemostats/forceps. I got a medical-grade pair 3 years ago and they are virtually indestructible and infinitely more functional than any cheap pair I’ve found. I paid about 10 or 15 bucks for these.


Not sure if I’ve ever lost a fish because of a flattened down barb; I haven’t noticed unhooking and releasing fish being any slower if I’ve left the barb on the hook. But I’m trying to make a habit out of pinching down barbs just in case the hook were to wind up embedded in me. No barb will do less damage when backing out of my arm, thumb, cheek, wherever.

You raise a good point about hemostats. I use them often enough for work and have tried a lot of different ones. The Pakistani ones look the same as the really good ones, at least initially. But they aren’t durable and break down quickly, even under normal or light use. The German-made ones are, as mentioned, the gold standard. You’ll lose them before something goes wrong with them. Years ago, I found some Swedish military surplus hemostats in some discount catalog; they were practically giving them away. Those were well made and held up under heavy use.
madguy30  
#14 Posted : Monday, January 21, 2019 1:34:21 AM(UTC)
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I try to remember to clip the barbs of my hook.


Makes it easier to just let the fish go while it's still in the water.

Snap a few pics here and there but I've never seen anything floating around on the walk back or anything.
Gurth  
#15 Posted : Tuesday, January 22, 2019 6:44:44 PM(UTC)
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Was watching a walleye show yesterday and they're catching 17-20 inchers and releasing them.

They actually paused several times to get their fingers into the gills so they could hold them up for the camera even saying "Wait so I can get this… there he is!"

Maybe I'm overreacting to this and it's not the end of the world but wouldn't be hard to just do it the right way and these guys should know better.

In addition, from a production standpoint, I can get a better look at their fish if they hold it horizontally.
“Harvest eaters... release trophies.” -Gurth
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
JGF  
#16 Posted : Tuesday, January 22, 2019 7:27:39 PM(UTC)
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My - I'm sure not to terribly popular - view on fish pix...they're typically boring. Can't believe that Insta Repeat hasn't done fish photos yet. (https://www.instagram.com/insta_repeat/?hl=en)

I've caught thousands of trout and probably handled even more as a biologist. If you've seen one brown, you've seen 90+% of the browns out there. Every once in a while, I catch something interesting that's worth taking a quick and well planned shot of but it's rare. I take landscape photos by at least a 10:1 ratio. Personally, I just find them much more interesting.

I've caught a few fish that were unique and photo worthy but a few a year. I didn't get a photo of my largest fish of the year as I just wasn't in a good place to get one - alone, tangled up in the net, etc.

I appreciate the more artistic shots - head shots, fin shots, unique perspectives, etc. I probably fish alone 75% of the time and doing these is rarely worth it.

All that said, most people seem to love fish pix. I don't get it. Maybe I'm just old?

Gurth  
#17 Posted : Tuesday, January 22, 2019 8:06:41 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: JGF Go to Quoted Post
I've caught thousands of trout and probably handled even more as a biologist.



Laugh


I've probably photographed thousands of trout… or at least a thousand.

I don't agree with your take on browns as I find them to be the prettiest and most diverse of (Wisconsin) fish, but it's okay if we disagree.

As a photographer, it rankles me a bit to be trying to capture anything worthwhile with an iPhone and being by myself with a squirming subject and an internal timer that is counting down, so most of the time I just grab a quick shot in my hand or a grip and grin (Piss off Rosenbauer!). Mostly for reference as I don't even share a smidge on here of what I shoot.

I am trying to take more release photos or ones where the fish is in the water. Other creative ways while not hanging onto the fish for too long. Still constrained though by an iPhone with only 3 feet between myself and subject matter.

I made a concerted effort to bring my dslr with me last year and spend more time photographing everything but the fish, but that petered out and I found it to be a pain to cart around with me and hated being limited on lenses.

I've got hard drives full of nature shots and landscape pans that will never see the light of day. I like em, but we don't decorate with photography and I don't care to 1) process all of them and 2) bother with trying to make money off of them.

Anyway, barely ever took a photo of a fish and went with a buddy several years ago and as we split up he said, "If you get any, snap a photo. No photo... it didn't happen."

Well… I did and it's been a compulsive habit ever since.

I've gotten much better as I used to shoot nearly every trout. It's probably around 30% now and I can see it continuing to drop.

I've been talking with a fly fishing buddy and I want to take my zoom out one day and shoot fish in the water as he battles>catches>release them. Will be hard for me not to fish, but excited to catch the images instead.

Plus… I'll have my rod along and get some fishing in.


As always though... to each their own.
“Harvest eaters... release trophies.” -Gurth
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
JGF  
#18 Posted : Tuesday, January 22, 2019 8:35:45 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Gurth Go to Quoted Post
Originally Posted by: JGF Go to Quoted Post
I've caught thousands of trout and probably handled even more as a biologist.
As always though... to each their own.


Indeed - and I started with the knowledge that my views on fish photos being boring are a minority. Only time I'd say much of anything about a person's choice is if they were doing things that were going to be killing a lot of fish. Quick shots and those where the fish are kept out of the water for 30 seconds or less are not a big deal. In my experiences having captured, weighed, measured, tagged, recaptured and done it all again; assuming water temperatures are within a good range, trout aren't as delicate as some make them out to be.

Of course, that's not to say that they can or should tolerate a lot of manhandling. Keep them wet, keep them out of the water for a short amount of time, get a quick photo or 2, and set them on their way and there's probably little, if any, difference between that and "normal" C&R.

I'll carry my DSLR with me once in awhile but it's a real pain, especially while wading. Not so bad in a boat with a dry bag. Thinking about a mirrorless some day but even that doesn't seem quite small or easy enough to carry without getting in the way too often.

rschmidt  
#19 Posted : Wednesday, January 23, 2019 12:44:39 AM(UTC)
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I'll add that the nice part of shooting video is that anything that happens can be turned into a pic. The options are endless and i get actual action. If anything I usually end up being too brief showing the fish to the camera, but frame by frame makes for a great shot every time! All this happens passively without having to manage the fish or the camera for great footage. Ron
Gurth  
#20 Posted : Wednesday, January 23, 2019 2:28:07 AM(UTC)
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Ron - I do that for scuba.

Used to use a really nice point and shoot in an underwater casing but now I just leave the GoPro rolling and look through the frames to find shots.

It's not as crisp as the camera photos, but with the red filter, it doesn't require near as much color correction.

Here's an example of a frame...

UserPostedImage


Being at depth in lower light causes more motion blur, but I can usually find a usable frame and these are just for my family anyway.

Keep meaning to take it on stream but it feels like it would be one more distraction when all I want to do is cast.
“Harvest eaters... release trophies.” -Gurth
Private correspondence at: jkschind "at" tds.net
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