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Life of Riley  
#1 Posted : Saturday, January 19, 2019 8:20:27 AM(UTC)
Life of Riley
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With all the bushwhacking some of you do, I'm wondering if anyone has ever had a run in with a cow or bull or any livestock for that matter? My relatives have a farm in Grant county and I've been around their cows a good bit and have never been nervous, but they do a great job in breeding calm temperment. Once there was a cow or bull (not sure on sex, it was black/white with small horns) that was bellering really loud and giving me the evil eye. I'm glad there was a small barbwire fence, but still was nervous about it.
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Guillermo  
#2 Posted : Saturday, January 19, 2019 11:08:00 AM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: Life of Riley Go to Quoted Post
With all the bushwhacking some of you do, I'm wondering if anyone has ever had a run in with a cow or bull or any livestock for that matter? My relatives have a farm in Grant county and I've been around their cows a good bit and have never been nervous, but they do a great job in breeding calm temperment. Once there was a cow or bull (not sure on sex, it was black/white with small horns) that was bellering really loud and giving me the evil eye. I'm glad there was a small barbwire fence, but still was nervous about it.


I got stared down hard by a bull one day. I just backed away slowly for about 100 yards and he never flinched. I left the stream figuring I'd used up all my luck for the day.
big_river_bum  
#3 Posted : Saturday, January 19, 2019 11:38:52 AM(UTC)
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i've always had bad luck with large groups of young steers. don't know if they'd really do anything once they got to me, but being chased by 50 large animals is pretty scary.

my great-grandma and my grandpa's brother were killed by a bull back in the 40s.
fifly333  
#4 Posted : Saturday, January 19, 2019 1:00:13 PM(UTC)
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Some times trout steams and curious cows make for great pictures.
Hegawn  
#5 Posted : Saturday, January 19, 2019 3:01:52 PM(UTC)
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They can be useful as indicators of an approaching game warden. Opening day several years ago, on a calm day I heard a branch snap-crack from far away and a bunch of calmly grazing cattle in the pasture between me in the stream and wooded hillside bolted. Seemed odd at the time but about the time it would take to hike from the sound of the breaking branch to me Mr. game warden showed up. What happened after that is fodder for another topic (fishing with a limit in my backpack, a WI game violation, got a warning for that)
"When you come to a fork in the stream, take it!" - if Yogi Berra was a trout chaser...
William Schlafer  
#6 Posted : Saturday, January 19, 2019 5:43:16 PM(UTC)
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Any cattle that interact with humans on a daily basis, are usually not a problem. Although sometimes they will follow you around thinking you're leading them to the feed lot.

Steers, bulls and heifers with calves can certainly be trouble. Never get between a cow and it's calve. Or for that matter, a bull and it's harem. If a bull or a steer is grunting and bobbing it's head, it's time to quietly move in the opposite direction. Avoid eye contact. Trees and brush are good places to go if a bull charges, as they have poor eye sight and have trouble picking you out from the background clutter.

Sometimes, cows in streams can be a benefit to Trout fishermen. They will kick up a lot of mud and stain the water, but that stained water will contain a lot of fish food. The turbid water may also entice Trout to come out from hiding on a sunny day to feed.

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-Bill
“You'll never look back on your life and wish you had spent more time in the office." -- Brian Trautman, Captain SV Delos
OTC_MN  
#7 Posted : Sunday, January 20, 2019 8:51:20 PM(UTC)
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I grew up with cattle so am pretty used to being around them and reading their body language.

Youngstock like a gaggle of steers, or grown cows without calves aren't much to worry about. They aren't especially bright, they're usually curious, fairly harmless, and really just want to get close enough to chew on you a little to see if they know you. Most of the time the biggest problem with them is them getting in the way of your backcast. By the way, if you run, they'll sometimes chase you, but they don't have any ill intent - they just think it's fun to run. Plus they're herd animals that are fairly open-minded about what is in their herd. If you run, they think there might be a reason for it, and they run too. Like I said - not especially bright.

Cows with calves can be a little dicey - especially range cattle that aren't as used to being around people all the time. Some breeds can be a little more belligerent than others. Herefords and angus are usually fine. Dairy cows are big babies. Longhorns and Brahmas can be a little more ornery. Just don't get between mom and junior and you'll usually be fine. A cow might act tough when they've got a calf and you get too close, but it's mostly just for show. I've been bumped around and jostled by cows many many times, but it's almost always an accident. They aren't exactly light on their feet.

Bulls are another story altogether.

Bulls can be as docile and calm as can be - until the day they decide they don't like the way you part your hair anymore. Then they go from docile to murderous in the blink of an eye. Every year you'll see stories about some poor farmer who really should have known better but got careless around a 'tame' bull that turned on him and mixed him in with enough topsoil to start a modest potato farm. They're utterly unpredictable, and they can be dangerous as hell. I give them a wide berth. There's a MN stream I fish with an easement that runs through a pasture, and on a hot day it isn't unusual to see an Angus bull the size of a small school bus cooling his nuts off in the stream. I just go somewhere else and fish another stretch.

There's a sign on a pasture fence along Hay Creek in MN that says "Do not cross this pasture unless you can do it in 3.7 seconds. The bull can do it in 3.8." Blink
"Our tradition is that of the first man who sneaked away to the creek when the tribe did not really need fish."
- Roderick Haig-Brown
WI-fly  
#8 Posted : Monday, January 21, 2019 2:45:27 PM(UTC)
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I stay away from bulls altogether and always keep a wary eye on any animal bigger than me. The only cattle I trust are those on a plate.
In high school football I was sarcastically nicknamed "the human bullet" by my coach (all in good fun). I haven't gotten any faster. Husky dudes in waders don't run very fast.
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AKinMN  
#9 Posted : Monday, January 21, 2019 5:20:13 PM(UTC)
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With bulls, as long as you can run faster than your fishing partner you're fine.
JGF  
#10 Posted : Monday, January 21, 2019 6:57:15 PM(UTC)
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Originally Posted by: AKinMN Go to Quoted Post
With bulls, as long as you can run faster than your fishing partner you're fine.


That's great but I fish alone most of the time. Maybe I need to find more old and slow fishing partners?

Been chased 20+ years ago by what was a well-known bull. Since then, I'm pretty careful and am good about watching my surroundings. Had a fun little experience with a cow and calf this year but was observant enough to get out of there before it got more interesting.

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